Date: 10/23/18 12:54 pm
From: Dennis Christie <dennisusan...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Tweeters Digest, Vol 170, Issue 21
Where is Oyhut? Thanks Susan Christie

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 21, 2018, at 12:01 PM, <tweeters-request...> wrote:
>
> Send Tweeters mailing list submissions to
> <tweeters...>
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> <tweeters-request...>
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> <tweeters-owner...>
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of Tweeters digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
> 1. BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 21, 2018
> (Ellen Blackstone)
> 2. Noble Knob raptors (Scott Ramos)
> 3. Westport Bar-tailed Godwit (Gary Fredricks)
> 4. Edmonds marsh northern harrier 10-20-18 (Bill Anderson)
> 5. Shorebirds at Ocean Shores (Gary Fredricks)
> 6. Gyrfalcon on Midway Beach (Gary Fredricks)
> 7. Maritime Katydids , and Other Things (Jeff Gibson)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Sat, 20 Oct 2018 12:02:03 -0700
> From: Ellen Blackstone <ellenblackstone...>
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] BirdNote, last week and the week of Oct. 21, 2018
> Message-ID: <2717ee1a2c0ad3d5858af8e5ef8e7b31...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8;
>
> Hey, Tweeters,
>
> We celebrate the artist of the 2019 federal duck stamp ?
> http://bit.ly/BirdNote-Celebrating_2019_Duck_Stamp-Winner
> ----------------------------------------------
> Last week on BirdNote:
> * Why Birds Collide with Buildings
> http://bit.ly/2NEsOLu
> * Woodpeckers Carve Out Roost Cavities, Too
> http://bit.ly/2woQCLv
> * Mistaken Identity
> http://bit.ly/2ywiyiD
> * The World's Most Abundant Bird
> http://bit.ly/2Cz1OM4
> * Chickadees on a Cold Night
> http://bit.ly/2QMEe1J
> * Monk Parakeets
> http://bit.ly/2QG3iqU
> * Researching High-flying Bar-headed Geese
> http://bit.ly/2CB7YLB
> -------------------------------------------------------
> Check out next week's stories:
> Here Come the Merlins! + Blue Jays, Chipping Sparrows, and more
> http://bit.ly/2J6BKZl
> -------------------------
> BirdNote is now in print. Check out BirdNote, the book:
> https://www.birdnote.org/birdnote-book
> -----------------------------------------------------------------
> Did you have a favorite story this week? Please let us know.
> mailto:<info...>
> =========================
> Sign up for the podcast: https://birdnote.org/get-podcasts-rss
> Find us on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/birdnoteradio?ref=ts
> ... or follow us on Twitter. https://twitter.com/birdnoteradio
> or Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/birdnoteradio/
> Listen on Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/birdnote
> ========================
> You can listen to the mp3, see photos, and read the transcript for a show, plus sign up for weekly mail or the podcast and find related resources on the website. https://www.birdnote.org
> You'll find 1500+ episodes and more than 1000 videos in the archive.
>
> Thanks for listening,
> Ellen Blackstone, BirdNote
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Sat, 20 Oct 2018 15:53:18 -0700
> From: Scott Ramos <lsr...>
> To: Tweeters Newsgroup <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Noble Knob raptors
> Message-ID: <B621F764-A17F-471F-9FC8-4E1B7C470CBB...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>
> Sorry for the late post. On Sunday, Oct 14, Dave Swayne, Sam Woods and I led a Seattle Audubon birding hike to Noble Knob. October has been a good month to observe migrating raptors and the Knob is well situated between two north-south oriented drainages that offers decent views of the migration. On this occasion, we had a good collection, including Golden and Bald Eagle, Sharp-shinned (about a dozen!) and Cooper?s Hawk, Red-tailed and Rough-legged Hawk, a Merlin and a possible Northern Goshawk.
>
> In addition to the target raptors, there were some bonus birds, including a perched Sooty Grouse along the forested trail, one or more Northern Shrike, a late Mountain Bluebird, several Townsend?s Solitaire and a very tame Horned Lark. We were able to stand very close to the lark for great views as it fed in the alpine meadow. At one point, it took a break from feeding to do a little dust bathing:
> https://youtu.be/5-NZqM5S9XQ
>
> Two of the lakes below the Knob had small groups of Barrow?s Goldeneye. Then, on what would be our last stop at a pullout on the way out, a Northern Pygmy-Owl flew in to Dave?s calling.
>
> Scott Ramos
> Seattle
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Sat, 20 Oct 2018 18:20:40 -0700
> From: Gary Fredricks <glfredricks55...>
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Westport Bar-tailed Godwit
> Message-ID:
> <CAKcG-6KmY4f8Xp6ZzRApPhzPxtkUmxqSNTiZ-4MLJmQFjjhNUw...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> The Bar-tailed Godwit was among the usual hundreds of Marbled Godwits late
> this afernoon in the Westport marina. Best viewed from float 21 next to the
> boat ramp and Coast Guard station.
>
> Gary Fredricks
> Washougal
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL: <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/pipermail/tweeters/attachments/20181020/b5af67f1/attachment-0001.html>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Sun, 21 Oct 2018 04:15:12 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
> To: "<tweeters...>" <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds marsh northern harrier 10-20-18
> Message-ID: <376151625.498656.1540095312223...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Another (the same?) harrier was at the marsh Saturday afternoon.? Photos can be seen by scrolling down page 15:
> http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/index.php?threads/wildlife-of-edmonds-wa-2018.16307/page-15
> Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL: <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/pipermail/tweeters/attachments/20181021/bb92e8a0/attachment-0001.html>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Sun, 21 Oct 2018 08:15:21 -0700
> From: Gary Fredricks <glfredricks55...>
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Shorebirds at Ocean Shores
> Message-ID:
> <CAKcG-6Jp1FtB70fk+=43cX8vfo=<DXoR-sYHjOdq23swfRovR_g...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Yesterday, I checked out the high tide roosting flock on the Oyhut game
> range. Present were hundreds of dunlin and black-bellied plovers, dozens
> of Western sandpipers, a few least sandpipers, six long-billed dowitchers
> and seven red- knots. I also flushed a couple of pectoral sandpipers near
> the western most pond. Of course, predators were also present with a
> Merlin, a peregrine, harriers, and bald eagles causing some excitement.
> Also, a northern shrike was hunting among the yards near the West end of
> Marine View Drive.
>
> Gary Fredricks
> Washougal
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL: <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/pipermail/tweeters/attachments/20181021/92630c34/attachment-0001.html>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Sun, 21 Oct 2018 10:49:10 -0700
> From: Gary Fredricks <glfredricks55...>
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Gyrfalcon on Midway Beach
> Message-ID:
> <CAKcG-6LG8w2xMQwoNy7rGGAWaoH=dy7qu=c9RMBiY=<Fg2rASjQ...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> About 10:30 this morning a gray phase Gyrfacon was on the upper beach
> between the Midway Beach and Warrenton Cannery Road access points. The
> blue-gray legs and bill indicated a probable first year bird.
>
> Gary Fredricks
> Washougal
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL: <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/pipermail/tweeters/attachments/20181021/78c62618/attachment-0001.html>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Sun, 21 Oct 2018 11:24:52 -0700
> From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15...>
> To: <tweeters...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Maritime Katydids , and Other Things
> Message-ID:
> <CABSAM3YXN4UjGm=gi+<s358g5hAtkukmfnM_589xtqJCsXr8zPg...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Tweeters having lived in, or spent time in The Great Humid East in
> summertime, must be familiar with the loud song of the Common True Katydid:
> one of the loudest insect callers ever. Back there, on rare trips to places
> like southern Ontario, New England, and Wisconsin, this maritime north
> westerner was thrilled to hear these big bugs. Typically up in trees they
> gave the auditory illusion of the trees themselves singing, especially
> trees isolated out in fields.
>
> Of course, around here we don't have those big loud things. But we do have
> very quiet ones. To find them I go to the beach, down to the maritime.
> Really.
>
> That's because half the Katydids I've seen here in Washington state have
> been down near the beach, previous to now. The first Katydid was found by
> my daughter Roxanne (known to some as Roxy etc - I call her Rox) down on
> Kalaloch beach, just about ready to get drownt. I ,( with my old Peterson
> field guide to NA insects) figured it to be a Meadow Katydid of some sort,
> A small brilliant green surprise along the great Pacific.
>
> The second Katydid I didn't find (I didn't but Roxydid) turned up at
> Wildberry Lake, Mason County - a big fat Fork-Tailed Bush Katydid about 2"
> long, looking like a green leaf with legs.Cool.
>
> This summer I've Been Katydid rich down at Indian Island County Park - a
> stellar spot for the all-around naturalist - where I've found plenty of
> Katydids. First I noted about a million small grasshoppers flying out of
> the low Salicornia patches in the salt marshes down there, Several of these
> would fly up with every boot step and scatter in all directions, sorta
> hard to track, but I finally (with my close-focusing binocs) got good looks
> at them : some sort of small Melanoplus grasshoppers - of whatever
> species.But in amongst the little grasshoppers was a somewhat smaller
> different bug, hard to see but finally revealed to be Katydids (the Slender
> Meadow Katydid near as I can tell) - and lots of 'em still around this week
> but thinning fast with colder weather.Unlike the big loud Katydids of the
> Great Humid East , these guys make a very high-frequency call beyond my
> ability to hear. I did hear a crackling (crepitating ) big Carolina
> Grasshopper down on the beach though.
>
> There are a number of interesting maritime plants in the salt marshes along
> the shore down there, like Plantago maritima, Cakile maritima, and Armeria
> maritima if you want to get specific. The Plantago I've noticed on seaside
> rocks for years, not knowing what it was ( ol' lazy-eyes me wrote it off as
> some kinda grass) but on closer inspection it has succulent leaves, which
> along with salty Salicornia, are pickled and eaten by some human's. Cakile
> is a pretty little beach flower (introduced, but it doesn't look like it's
> bothering anyone and bee's love it).
>
> Then the Sea Thrift - a fine little flower which I've mostly seen on rocky
> bluffs and in peoples yards - it domesticates well. But here on Indian
> Island it grows all over the sandy, gravelly shores of the salt marsh
> behind the drift wood barrier along the beach. It's all done blooming
> (usually in spring) but in an example of autumnal recrudescence, I did find
> one fresh pink flower amongst the hundred of old dry seedheads.
>
> The Sea Thrift has a wide circumboreal distribution, yet I was surprised to
> see it on the documentary film "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" which I watched
> on netflix when I got home from the beach. Yup, there it was, growing on
> the sea island where Luke Skywalker retired. Clearly visible as Luke, or
> somebody, was tip-toeing up the grassy cliffs.
>
> Jeff Gibson
> may the force be with you
> Port Townsend Wa
>
> P.S. I forgot to mention that I saw a Short-eared Owl down at Indian Island
> the other day flying in to hide in a Dougfir at noon. It appeared to be
> fleeing another bird from above, but I never saw what. The little tidal
> channels there can be good for shorebirds at appropriate tides, and the
> rocks (jetty and shoreline) down by the Portage also get some rocky shore
> birds.
>
> P.P.S Rather than being long ago, in a galaxy far, far away, it turns out
> that Luke Skywalker retired in Ireland. I checked the film location
> credits, so as to be accurate about the thrift. Just sayin'
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL: <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/pipermail/tweeters/attachments/20181021/14350705/attachment-0001.html>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Subject: Digest Footer
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of Tweeters Digest, Vol 170, Issue 21
> *****************************************

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
<Tweeters...>
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
 
Join us on Facebook!