Date: 10/17/18 7:04 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Fire ants
Thanks for the advice. At our new place in Maumelle, I am dealing with fire ants for the first time.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 17, 2018, at 4:36 PM, Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> All —
>
> I regard fire ants as a serious threat to the ecosystem of my small acreage. I haven't seen fire ants attack birds but that doesn't mean it's not happening. I've see the ants attack Monarch caterpillars and adults.
>
> Fire ants create mounds in lots of places — I've seen them in flower pots and beds, against trees, under logs and lumber, in the base of round bales of hay. I created those flower beds and pots to attract insects and birds, so fire ants are not a good thing there.
>
> The other day I picked up branch loppers that someone had dropped in the yard and they were all over the end of that tool.
>
> This website by Amdro sheds a lot of light on their presence and structure.
>
> https://www.amdro.com/learn/fire-ants/understanding-a-fire-ant-colony
>
> We tend to focus on the mound, but the mound, as you will see on this web page, is not the entry and exit point for the colony.
>
> And the colony may be huge. Destroying a mound — which I have done out of frustration — may provide satisfaction but it won't kill the colony. I've poured gallons of soapy water in the tunnels of a destroyed mound and the ants create a new nest nearby days or weeks later. (The soap does kill ants, but I doubt it gets to the queen.)
>
> I don't like spreading poison in the ecosystem, but spreading a little to kill a colony that's an invasive species is better, in my mind, than allowing the invasive species to continue to take over an area.
>
> I rotate using Amdro and an Ortho product that have different chemicals. They are similar in that they are granules spread around the mound.
>
> Alyson Hoge
> Pulaski County
>
>

 
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