Date: 7/1/18 8:48 pm
From: Joel Geier <joel.geier...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Ochoco Mtns: Buffleheads at historic nesting site (Crook) etc.
Great suggestion, Wayne, and thanks for raising the idea of an update of
the "big tome," Alan.

For birders recent to the list, BOGR stands for "Birds of Oregon: A
General Reference."

I was thinking about an update of the Breeding Bird Atlas as a first
step (as mentioned by Paul Adamus). But an update of BOGR to integrate
the new information would be really valuable.

The Oregon 2020 project should yield some data on breeding bird density,
at least as I understand it. I still haven't seen a full description of
the plan and the methods, so perhaps Doug Robinson and his colleagues at
OSU can make that available. My understanding is that this project aims
to sample bird abundance using point counts that are distributed based
on a stratified random sampling approach, and then extrapolate the
results based on land-cover data.

So (to oversimplify just a bit) if stationary/point counts in a small
sample of replanted clearcuts yield a certain frequency of Willow
Flycatcher or Yellow-breasted Chat detections, that would be used to
estimate densities of those species over replanted clearcuts of similar
age, in the same region. I have no doubt that the actual analysis in the
end will be much more sophisticated, using kriging and other
spatio-temporal statistical techniques.

This approach could work well for relatively common species. There could
be drawbacks for less common species that depend on subtleties of
habitat that could be overlooked in the land-cover analysis. For
example, "Oregon" Vesper Sparrows can be locally common or entirely
absent from ranch lands in western Oregon that look great from satellite
images, depending on the particulars of how individual ranch owners
manage their pastures. For some species, seasonal timing of
land-management actions can make a big difference.

So most likely at the end of the project, there will need to be further
interpretation based on local experience and ground-truthing,
particularly for the less common species where statistical sampling
anomalies and abilities/focus of individual observers can play a huge
role.

There's also a difference between detecting birds on point counts during
breeding season, vs. actually documenting breeding. I've recorded a fair
number of Golden-crowned Sparrows during point counts in May, but I'm
still not convinced that this species nests in Oregon. For confirming
breeding status, a breeding-bird atlas approach is more valuable than 5-
or 10-minute point counts. Sometimes you need to stick with a bird for a
longer interval, and observe other behavioral clues.

So count me in as someone who would like to see a reprise of the Oregon
Breeding Bird Atlas, even while recognizing that density-estimation
projects like OR2020 could yield useful information. I'd also strongly
support Alan's and Wayne's suggestions of updating BOGR, at least on a
selective basis for species for which we think the status has changed
since 2002.

Good birding,
Joel



On Sun, 2018-07-01 at 20:02 -0700, Wayne Hoffman wrote:
> Good thoughts, Alan -
>
>
>
> It might be useful to ask OBOL posters to nominate species whose
> status has changed enough to particularly deserve updates.
>
>
> Obvious things would be the species added to the state list since BOGR
> - Masked Booby, Tundra Bean Goose, (Un)Common Scoter, Skylark, etc.
>
>
> Another group worthy of consideration is the grassland birds with
> precarious starus west of the Cascades: Grasshopper and Vesper
> Sparrow, Horned Lark, etc.
>
>
> A couple nominations of my own to start things off: Franklin's Gull
> and Eurasian Collared-Dove.
>
>
> Wayne
>
>
>
>
>
> >
> > On 7/1/2018 5:11:12 PM, Alan Contreras <acontrer56...> wrote:
> >
> > I guess I should say something about this, as should Matt Hunter.
> > There are some very preliminary, casual and informal discussions
> > happening regarding the best way to keep Birds of Oregon: A General
> > Reference updated in some way. At some point I suspect these
> > discussions will at least brush up against the Oregon 2020 project.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > The year 2023 is the 20th anniversary of BOGR but our data cut off
> > in 2002 (that means that I am an old person, sigh...). As we all
> > know, bird status changes. Much of what is in BOGR remains valid
> > and largely useful today. Some of the distribution and timing
> > information has changed more than the rest.
> >
> >
> > There is no perfect way to meet the demand for a definitive update
> > because definitive status information by its nature does not exist.
> > What exists is transitory the moment it appears. However, there is
> > virtue in having as good a unified source for Oregon bird
> > information as we can manage. Some of this (e.g. migration timing)
> > can have a primary source in eBird. Some (e.g. habitat use) not so
> > well.
> >
> >
> > BOGR did not do as much with population *density* as it might have.
> > The maps were last-minute, limited and simply a replicate of the
> > Atlas maps from the 1990s. Not bad, not great, and summer-only.
> > That’s one reason why I made the hand-shaded maps in the paperback
> > Handbook of Oregon Birds a few years later. That book had its own
> > issues but is still useful as something to throw in the car.
> >
> >
> > It is unlikely for reasons of cost that BOGR would go into a full
> > revision or reprint. However, it is likely that some kind of
> > addendum, supplement or update can be done on paper and the web and
> > would be useful. At this time there is no formal working group
> > established to do this. My expectation is that Matt Hunter would be
> > the lead dog on this when it happens, assuming he wants to be.
> >
> >
> > In the meantime, keep enjoying birding in Oregon and when you find
> > interesting things, let the world know.
> >
> >
> > Cheers - Alan
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Alan Contreras
> > <acontrer56...>
> > Eugene, Oregon
> >
> >
> > www.alanlcontreras.com
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > > On Jul 1, 2018, at 4:02 PM, Joel Geier <joel.geier...>
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Alan & All,
> > >
> > > As I recall, your observation of a summering pair near Juntura was
> > > the second-best evidence for Bufflehead nesting in Oregon outside
> > > of the Cascades, at the time that Rachel White Scheuering was
> > > writing the species account for "Birds of Oregon: A General
> > > Reference."
> > >
> > > Nancy Stotz' observation of two females with broods on Delintment
> > > Lake this year is another full notch above our observations, on
> > > the "breeding confirmation" scale.
> > >
> > > Which goes to show, we're due for an update of the Oregon Breeding
> > > Bird Atlas!
> > >
> > > Happy birding,
> > > Joel
> > >
> > > On Sun, 2018-07-01 at 10:33 -0700, Alan Contreras wrote:
> > >
> > > > In the late 1990s I found Bufflehead hanging aroung the flooded
> > > > snags at the upper end of Beulah Reservoir near Juntura in
> > > > summer. I’m not sure if that site is still in use but I’m pretty
> > > > sure they were breeding there.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Alan Contreras
> > > > <acontrer56...>
> > > > Eugene, Oregon
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > www.alanlcontreras.com
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > Joel Geier
> > > Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
> > >
> >
> >
> >


 
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