Date: 6/22/18 1:21 pm
From: Shep Thorp <shepthorp...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR, Wednesday Walk for 6/20/2018
Hi Tweets,

approximately 35 of us had a beautiful warm day at the Refuge with
temperatures in the 70 to 80's degrees Fahrenheit and a High 9.49ft Tide at
11:48am. The morning chorus was fabulous. Highlights included nice views
of many male birds singing on territory, nesting BALD EAGLE, BELTED
KINGFISHER, BARN SWALLOW, TREE SWALLOW, CLIFF SWALLOW, CEDAR WAXWING, and
SWAINSON'S THRUSH. We have had an influx of second cycle CALIFORNIA GULL
and three banded CASPIAN TERN out on the tide flats.

Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook at 8am, we saw many
nesting BARN SWALLOW in the Visitor Center. TREE SWALLOW and NORTHERN
ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW were foraging over the pond and we had nice looks of
HOODED MERGANSER, MALLARD, COMMON YELLOW-THROAT, and SONG SPARROW.

The Orchard was good for both RUFOUS and ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD, WESTERN WOOD
PEWEE, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, YELLOW WARBLER, SPOTTED TOWHEE, DARK-EYED JUNCO
and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. CEDAR WAXWING was located on multiple nest sites.
Many BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS were heard and seen.

Along the Access Road we picked up BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, BUSHTIT, BEWICKS
WREN, and CLIFF SWALLOW. There is an OSPREY on the nest in a cell phone
tower south of I5 on the ridge along the west bank of McAllister Creek. A
male BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK is singing on territory adjacent to the west
parking lot.

The west entrance to the Twin Barns Loop Trail is great for woodpeckers,
swallows, warblers, flycatchers and wrens. We added WILLOW FLYCATCHER,
PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER, DOWNY WOODPECKER, HAIRY WOODPECKER, RED-BREASTED
SAPSUCKER, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, BEWICKS WREN and MARSH WREN to our
list. VIRGINIA RAIL was heard. The cut off for the Twin Barns has been
good for BROWN CREEPER.

The Twin Barns Overlook was good for swallows. The grass in the fields has
grown high, and water is no longer visible. For the day we had 6 MALLARD,
2 HOODED MERGANSER, and 20 CANADA GEESE. Probable my personal lowest water
fowl count. I suspect many are there hiding in the grass and marsh raising
young.

Out on the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail, the 9ft high tide pushed
many gulls and terns, for closer viewing. We observed a high count of
second cycle CALIFORNIA GULL, as well many CASPIAN TERNS. Three terns were
banded and will be report to the BBS. There were large flocks of
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, 200-300, and GREAT BLUE HERON, 200-300, foraging
along the channels. As the eagle flies, so did all the birds on the mud
flats. In the fresh water marsh we had nice looks of RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD,
KILLDEER, WILSON'S SNIPE, MARSH WREN, and SAVANNAH SPARROW. VIRGINIA RAIL
was heard.

From the McAllister Creek Viewing Platform on the Nisqually Estuary
Boardwalk Trail, you can get great scope views of the BALD EAGLE nest with
two chicks. The nest is along the west bank of the McAllister Creek just
south and west of the Viewing Platform. The Puget Sound Viewing Platform
was good for picking up PURPLE MARTIN off Luhr Beach and BRANDT CORMORANT
on the channel marker north of the Nisqually River. We observed two
juvenile BELTED KINGFISHER, with parents along the banks of the McAllister
Creek.

On our return, we picked up WARBLING VIREO and CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE
along the east side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail. As well a nesting
SWAINSON'S THRUSH along the Riparian Forest Overlook.

We had 62 species for the day, and the walk has 143 species for the year.
Mammals seen included Eastern Cotton-tailed Rabbit, Columbian Black-tailed
Deer, Eastern Gray Squirrel and Harbor Seal.

Until next week, when we meet again at 8am at the Visitor Center Pond
Overlook, happy birding!

Shep Thorp
--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742

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