Date: 6/13/18 5:57 am
From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Oystercatchers
*

At one point I heard that there were three pairs nesting inside the city limits of Portland, none of them the result of human effort—just spontaneous response to the opportunity. That is to say, the expensive efforts bore no results. A fortune has been spent in south Texas to reintroduce Aplomado Falcons. Great Horned Owls eat them as fast as they are released. Money would be far better spent on chainsaws and their operators to remove the mesquite that harbors the owls, compromises the grassland. Not nearly as glamorous, but I like a bang for my endangered species buck. These high profile black holes pale in comparison to the Steller’s Eider. A graduate student working on their recovery program on Alaska’s North Slope told me it has been the most expensive program per bird to date. Two years ago 360 fertile eggs intended for cross fostering were never placed in nests.
I met a biologist at Thompson Reservoir in June of 1982, when the Peregrine hacking program was in its infancy. At that time the first site planned for Oregon was Crater Lake. There is obviously no food supply in the national park, putative parents would have had to commute to Klamath Forest marsh. But there were many human visitors to the desert cliffs of Crater Lake, making it a high profile endeavor. lpn
> On Jun 12, 2018, at 5:05 PM, Jeff Gilligan <jeffgilligan10...> wrote:
>
>
>> On Jun 12, 2018, at 5:02 PM, Roy Lowe <roy.loweiii...> <mailto:<roy.loweiii...>> wrote:
>>
>> I don’t think peregrines have been hacked in Oregon for more than two decades. They’re doing well on their own.
>>
>> Roy
>>
>
> They were being hacked on Sauvie's Island as recently s a few years ago, as well as somewhere on the Washington side of the Columbia nearby. I agree that they are doing fine on their own.
>
> Jeff Gilligan
>


 
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