Date: 6/11/18 12:41 pm
From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Breeding range expansions .... a topic for Oregon Birds magazine?!
Hi all,

I just had a chance to finally peruse this thread from the library in the
little mining town of Hadley, Central Nevada (where I'm doing field work
during the month of June). Interesting stuff!

Would anyone like to volunteer to write up an article about this topic for
Oregon Birds magazine? I think this would make a very interesting article
for our journal.

I'd love to hear from someone about this!

Thanks, and see y'all back in Oregon in July

Hendrik


On Wed, Jun 6, 2018 at 8:31 PM, Alan Contreras <acontrer56...> wrote:

> I think there are only a few pairs of Snowy E at Malheur in recent years.
>
> Another big expander is Great Egret. There weren’t any breeders that I
> know of in western Oregon in the early 1970s but now they breed at several
> sites at Coos Bay, Reedsport, Florence and obviously here and there in NW
> Oregon. We don’t know where the nests are in Eugene but there have
> obviously been a dozen pairs nesting somewhere west of town the last three
> years.
>
>
> Alan Contreras
> <acontrer56...>
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> www.alanlcontreras.com
>
>
>
> On Jun 6, 2018, at 8:02 PM, Wayne Hoffman <whoffman...> wrote:
>
> Here are some declining species, not including ones listed as endangered
> or threatened.
>
> 1. Common Murre. Total colony failure for years on the north and central
> coasts, and declining production on south coast from Bald Eagle predation
> and associated egg/chick loss.
>
> 2. Upland Sandpiper. Always rare as a breeder, now apparently extirpated.
>
> 3. Snowy Egret. Seems much less common as a breeder in SE Oregon than in
> 1970s.
>
> 4. Sage Grouse
>
> 5. Yellow-billed Cuckoo
>
> 6. Canyon Wren??? A feeling, but without much data.
>
> 7. Hermit Warbler
>
> Wayne Hoffman
> South Beach
>
> On 6/6/2018 5:44:26 PM, Joel Geier <joel.geier...> wrote:
> For rapid breeding range expansions into Oregon by species native to
> North America, if we measure this in terms of time to go from "rare" to
> "ubiquitous," my vote goes to Barred Owl. During the past 20 years, this
> species has gone from a "rare" bird that used to produce excited reports
> on OBOL, to regular in virtually all Oregon habitats except sagebrush
> steppe and alpine. It's now one of the more common road-kill species
> along the highway that runs past our house (6 specimens in the past 3
> years).
>
> But what about species going in the other direction? Which native bird
> species have gotten noticeably harder to find in that same period? I
> have my ideas but I'm interested to hear yours.
>
>
> --
> Joel Geier
> Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
>
>
>
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>
>


--
__________________________
Hendrik G. Herlyn
Corvallis, OR


*"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home." -- Gary Snyder*

 
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