Date: 6/1/18 9:30 am
From: Tom Sullivan <tomsullivan9...>
Subject: Re: [MASSBIRD] Bay-breasted, Harvard Yard/crazy Quebec report
The North Coast of Quebec, Cote Nord, is serviced by a once a week ferry
http://relaisnordik.com/en/. It makes for a cruise through the wilderness.
We took the boat from Havre Sainte Pierre to Harrington Harbour and back.
It is all a wonderful vacation destination.

On Fri, Jun 1, 2018 at 9:40 AM, Childs, Jackson <jchilds...>
wrote:

> Hi Josh,
>
>
>
> Thank you for your comments. I think you are right there is a confluence
> of date, weather, geography. I’ve also suspected that migration gets to be
> more precise or condensed as birds get closer to their destination: a
> species tends to hit a breeding area almost all on the same day, given the
> competition for territory (probably there are papers on this, so sorry if
> this is amateurish speculation). So the numbers counted may be a
> substantial percentage of the population of those species for that region.
> Also, I understand there has been a spruce budworm outbreak in just that
> region of Quebec in recent years, although I don’t know what the status is
> of that this year.
>
>
>
> However, the very interesting thing I learned from the NYTimes article
> about the report (https://www.nytimes.com/2018/
> 05/31/science/warblers-canada-migration.html?smtyp=cur&smid=
> tw-nytimesscience ) is that the birds were flying along the river going
> *southwest*. This was, it seems, the greatest ever example of reverse
> migration or morning flight. And it went all day, which is hard to get your
> mind around in itself.
>
>
>
> Sorry about your misses. It’s hard to identify a song if you never see the
> species, a problem I have with Cape May warblers.
>
>
>
> Jackson Childs
>
> <jchilds...>
>
> Arlington, MA
>
>
>
> *From:* <massbird-approval...> [mailto:massbird-approval@
> TheWorld.com] *On Behalf Of *Josh
> *Sent:* Thursday, May 31, 2018 5:53 PM
> *To:* Massbird
> *Subject:* Re: [MASSBIRD] Bay-breasted, Harvard Yard/crazy Quebec report
>
>
>
> Hi Jackson,
>
>
>
> If you look at the map of the location from which that report was filed
>
>
>
> https://www.google.com/maps?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=48.1548874,
> -69.6665911&ll=48.1548874,-69.6665911
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.google.com_maps-3Fie-3DUTF8-26t-3Dp-26z-3D13-26q-3D48.1548874-2C-2D69.6665911-26ll-3D48.1548874-2C-2D69.6665911&d=DwMFaQ&c=WO-RGvefibhHBZq3fL85hQ&r=Nha_zH7gdBgFBnEzo5HwcQr_ZSIEGzaBNeTmFyMdZr8&m=RaoDu30UcIqo7oxpV3nUXEbLmRrNnYFfGVEAcXIIzrA&s=rVSKmPPgRneFYNjdsqkhKzisUB1fksK-exZffT48758&e=>
>
>
> (If that link doesn’t work, just go to Ian’s eBird report and click where
> it says “Map"
>
>
>
> It’s right on the shore of the Saint Lawrence River, which runs more or
> less from the Great Lakes near its west end to the Atlantic on its east.
> North of there is a huge area which is, as far as I can tell,
> overwhelmingly unpopulated and undeveloped. The acreage appears to be
> larger than the combined total of all of New England, New York,
> Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick, combined; but without most of
> the cities, highways, sprawl, fragmentation, etc. So I think the phenomenon
> is one where the weather (Ian comments about the wind direction and rain in
> his eBird report) and geography bottlenecked, in both space and time, the
> breeding bird population of a really large and healthy ecosystem. The only
> other similarly large and healthy ecosystems are further west in Canada and
> Alaska, and have mostly land south of them without any really large bodies
> of water, so the migrants headed there can spread out over much wider areas
> on their way north.
>
>
>
> That’s my hypothesis anyway. Maybe Ian himself will weigh in on the topic,
> after he catches up on his sleep, which might be in November or so knowing
> him.
>
>
>
> As for your lack of Cape Mays, I’ve managed to miss both that *and*
> Bay-breasted, and Mourning too, not just this year but pretty much entirely
> since I left Texas and moved back to Massachusetts. Not that I’ve made
> concerted efforts to target those species, but I’ve seen 27 other warbler
> species in the state during the same span of time, you’d think I’d have
> blundered into one or two of that trio by now. I’d worry that my hearing
> was declining, but I’m not having any trouble hearing Black-and-Whites,
> Blackpolls, or Brown Creepers as far as I can tell… yet…
>
>
>
> Good birding,
>
>
>
> JSR
>
>
>
>
>
> Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
> Amherst, MA
> http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bugguide.net_user_view_2399&d=DwMFaQ&c=WO-RGvefibhHBZq3fL85hQ&r=Nha_zH7gdBgFBnEzo5HwcQr_ZSIEGzaBNeTmFyMdZr8&m=RaoDu30UcIqo7oxpV3nUXEbLmRrNnYFfGVEAcXIIzrA&s=Ax08isFSH7sTezzMHyxOGD0VoP2hzfG_iOvJRj4rq7o&e=>
>
> https://www.facebook.com/opihi
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_opihi&d=DwMFaQ&c=WO-RGvefibhHBZq3fL85hQ&r=Nha_zH7gdBgFBnEzo5HwcQr_ZSIEGzaBNeTmFyMdZr8&m=RaoDu30UcIqo7oxpV3nUXEbLmRrNnYFfGVEAcXIIzrA&s=gRr1KjWij59vgvn07hQUn5_5D1i278i0gGi7pRgyS2M&e=>
>
>
>
> On May 29, 2018, at 9:21 AM, Childs, Jackson <jchilds...>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> Big year for this species continues. One was singing vigorously by Lamont
> library this morning, getting late.
>
>
>
> The report from Quebec has broken my brain. I couldn’t find *one* Cape
> May myself this spring lol. Does anyone have any insight into this
> phenomenon?
>
>
> Jackson Childs
>
> <jchilds...>
>
> Arlington, MA
>
>
>



--
Tom Sullivan
617-416-4762
<tomsullivan9...>

 
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