Date: 5/31/18 6:33 pm
From: Dan McDougall-Treacy <danmcdt...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Montlake Fill
Today around4:00 I visited the Fill in hopes of Ash-throated Flycatcher or Lazuli Bunting.
Neither turned up at the various places they'd been seen of late.
I did speak to a fellow on bike with bins, who reported seeing 2 Western Kingbirds and an Eastern Kingbird - both at the south end of Main Pond- WEKIs eventually moving west.
I did have a few good looks at the single EAKI. Always flycatching from top of bare trees, on each side of the trail near Main Pond. Around 4:35.
Dan

Dan McDougall-Treacy
206/402-9426

> On May 31, 2018, at 12:00 PM, <tweeters-request...> wrote:
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> Today's Topics:
>
> 1. Nisqually NWR 5/30/18 (Phil Kelley)
> 2. M St, Auburn, KIng County (Marv Breece)
> 3. Nighthawks in Yakima Canyon (Dan Reiff, PhD)
> 4. Ash-throated Flycatcher Montlake Fill (Louis Kreemer)
> 5. unsubscribe (Karen Albright)
> 6. Edmonds marsh mourning dove and cedar waxwings 5-28-18
> (Bill Anderson)
> 7. Long-billed curlew at marymoor (<kayliningalls...>)
> 8. Nighthawks and Bats (<festuca...>)
> 9. Possible nesting Loggerhead Shrike in Asotin County.
> (Keith Carlson)
> 10. WOS Member Photo Night June 4 (cynthia burrell)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 30 May 2018 15:49:34 -0700
> From: Phil Kelley <scrubjay323...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR 5/30/18
> To: "Dennis & Bonnie" <dennisweeks1...>, Glynnis Nakai
> <glynnis_nakai...>, Teresa Hertzel <Nancy.hertzel...>,
> Tweeters <tweeters...>, Phil Kelley
> <scrubjay323...>
> Message-ID:
> <CADwGeZ+D=8AHdxhZ_2kzWJvpNqOWGHaeC+<GPxFxUOdhbn7NAiQ...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Tweets,
>
> Today 40 of us enjoyed a nice walk at Nisqually. It was cool and dry
> and the sun came out after a bit but it wasn't very birdy, at least
> not in the number of species seen. We had a -1.7 low tide at 1:34 PM
> so lots of mud at the reclamation area.
>
> The trees are all leafed out and the grass is high so we heard a lot
> of twittering but had difficulty viewing. We did have lots of YELLOW
> WARBLERS, SWAINSON'S THRUSHES, and MARSH WRENS, but nothing out of the
> ordinary.
>
> With the low tide I don't know if anyone walked the estuary boardwalk
> but Shep will post an ebird report when he finishes.
>
> For the day I had 37 species with BAND-TAILED PIGEON being new for the
> year. I now have 105 species for the year. Mammals seen included
> LONG-TAILED WEASEL, COTTONTAILED RABBIT, and MUSKRAT.
>
> Until next week....
>
> Phil Kelley
> <scrubjay323...>
> Lacey, WA
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Wed, 30 May 2018 19:54:53 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Marv Breece <marvbreece...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] M St, Auburn, KIng County
> To: Tweeters <Tweeters...>
> Message-ID: <526872139.78220772.1527724493394.JavaMail.zimbra...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> This afternoon, on and over the main pond at M Street (Emerald Downs) were 2 VAUX'S SWIFTS, 2 BANK SWALLOWS & 10 (TEN) GREATER YELLOWLEGS.
>
> --
> Marv Breece
> Tukwila, WA
> <marvbreece...>
>
> Concepts shape our world.
> Concepts are not hard wired.
>
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Wed, 30 May 2018 22:16:34 -0700
> From: "Dan Reiff, PhD" <dan.owl.reiff...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Nighthawks in Yakima Canyon
> To: <tweeters...>
> Message-ID: <3571808A-0571-4549-A761-C48E22939D8E...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>
> Tweeters community,
>
> I found a Total of at least 10 C. Nighthawks in Yakima Canyon Tuesday evening.
> One hunted low at head level around me. A group of six seemed to working their way up canyon. Others seemed to be playing, including spectacular dives and hunting.
> Was Windy and chilly there. The wind didn’t seem to affect them at all. Very neat to see them again.
> Unfortunately, I found a freshly dead Poorwill on the canyon road. It’s mate was nearby and flew by me chased by a 🦇 bat.
> They don’t like bats and will temporarily leave an area if bats compete for food.
>
> Dan Reiff
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Wed, 30 May 2018 22:58:18 -0700
> From: Louis Kreemer <lpkreemer...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Ash-throated Flycatcher Montlake Fill
> To: <tweeters...>
> Message-ID:
> <CAN5kSE9-C7K2arWtTV7v2740x++<ZjgWu2SK6M-W2swJ25gAXDw...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Hi Tweets,
>
> The Ash-throated Flycatcher found by Connie earlier today was still at the
> Fill this afternoon at about 4:30 PM. At first Alex Sowers and I completed
> the Loop trail but didn't find anything, and ran into a couple folks who
> had been looking with no success. Eventually to our delight it shocked us
> by showing up in the west edge of Sidles Swamp. We probably wouldn't have
> seen it if it weren't for our interest in the nesting House Wrens that have
> taken up nesting in a cavity in a snag. At one point both the wren and
> flycatcher were in the same binocular view. Right as we were about to leave
> the flycatcher flew over our heads and appeared to land in the trees
> bordering Main Pond. If you pursue this bird I would recommend limiting
> your time, as WSDOT will be spraying more herbicides over the next couple
> of days, and I believe I was affected due to a headache. It was worth it
> though! My apologies for the belated report.
>
> Louis Kreemer
> Seattle
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Wed, 30 May 2018 23:18:15 -0700
> From: Karen Albright <karenalbright12...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] unsubscribe
> To: tweeters <Tweeters...>
> Message-ID:
> <CA+_A+RKjFp51y1PUqDksCinr9UuWt7jNWadrrK2tQN+<1Avz13w...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> I am moving out of state. I can't remember the procedure for removing
> myself from the listserv.
>
> Thank you
> Karen
> --
>
> *GO HAWKS !!!!!!*
> *AND CHIEFS !!!!!!!*
>
> Explore. Dream. Discover.
>
> Karen
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Thu, 31 May 2018 06:55:29 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Bill Anderson <billandersonbic...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds marsh mourning dove and cedar waxwings
> 5-28-18
> To: "<tweeters...>" <tweeters...>
> Message-ID: <1926012890.7111028.1527749729261...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> A mourning dove and a pair of cedar waxwings perched on the old martin gourd holder Monday afternoon at the Edmonds marsh. Photos can be seen by scrolling down page 8:
> http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/index.php?threads/wildlife-of-edmonds-wa-2018.16307/page-8
> Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA. USA
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Thu, 31 May 2018 08:50:46 -0700
> From: <kayliningalls...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Long-billed curlew at marymoor
> To: <tweeters...>
> Message-ID: <38A12CED-BAAC-4E4A-B652-737EC212004D...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>
> I’m looking at a long-billed curlew at marymoor right now (8:50 am), across the street from parking lot G in the big fields/parking lots.
> If anyone has the contact information of micheal hobbs or someone doing the marymoor walk today, I’d appreciate someone passing on this bird, I saw them earlier but am not sure which way they went.
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Thu, 31 May 2018 16:47:06 +0000 (UTC)
> From: <festuca...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Nighthawks and Bats
> To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
> Message-ID:
> <2075059008.59211431.1527785226291.JavaMail.zimbra...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Hi folks,
>
> I was intrigued by Dan's statement that "They don't like bats and will temporarily leave an area if bats compete for food."
>
> I thought about the times that I'd seen bats and nighthawks foraging together and couldn't remember times that I saw negative interactions. As a young boy in Albany, Oregon in the 1960s, when & where the nighthawks used to nest on the town's rooftops, I would often watch the nighthawks and bats come out and concurrently forage late into the summer evenings and then at dark under and around the street lamps.
>
> My first thought on the matter is that bats and nighthawks would not necessarily be 'competing' for the same species of insects, due to their different body sizes and nutritional requirements, as well as their foraging strategies and abilities.
>
> I did a quick 'google' of bats & nighthawks, and was surprised to find this was one of the first scientific papers that came up on the subject:
>
>
>
> “Bird Versus Bats: Behavioral Interactions at a Localized Food Source” by William M. Shields and Keith L. Bildstein, in Ecology Volume 60, No. 3 (Jun., 1979), pp. 468-474
>
>
>
> Abstract: During June and July 1976, we investigated the foraging behavior and interactions of bats and common nighthawks (Chordeiles minor) at a localized food source in Columbus, Ohio. The patch consisted of insects attracted to a cone of light produced by six large (1000 W) spotlights illuminating a sign. While foraging in the light cone members of both taxa engaged in both intra- and interspecific chases. Seventy-five percent of the bat-initiated and 94% of the nighthawk-initiated chases had nighthawk targets. The smaller bats appeared to dominate the larger birds in all individual aggressive encounters. Members of both taxa foraged differently while using the patch. When either birds or bats foraged in the absence of members of the other taxon, they foraged low in the light cone. When birds and bats were present simultaneously, the aggressive interactions conditioned their foraging behavior. When together, bats remained in the lower zone of the light cone, while some ni!
> ghthawks rose into the upper zones. When foraging in these upper zones, nighthawks suffered a decrease in foraging efficiency based on energetic considerations. They missed more prey per attempted capture, and either increased the time between captures or increased their foraging speed in the upper zones. In any case, more energy was expended by nighthawks foraging in the presence of bats than when they were alone. The expanded pattern of patch used by the larger yet socially subordinate nighthawks in the presence of bats supports Morse's (1974) hypothesis. Morse predicted that social dominance would be more important than body size in determining resource use in communities where interspecific aggression and dominance is important in resource partitioning.
>
> On the other hand, the next article that came up was " Observation of Common Nighthawks (Chordeiles minor) and Bats (Chiroptera) Feeding Concurrently", by Gabriel J. Foley and Lyndsie S. Wszola in the Northeastern Naturalist Jun 2017 : Vol. 24, Issue 2, pages N26- N28 .
>
>
>
>
>
> Abstract: Records of bats and birds concurrently exploiting the same food source are rare in the literature. We observed an instance of bats and Chordeiles minor (Common Nighthawk) foraging in artificial light around the Washington Monument. Our observation corroborates earlier evidence that bats and Common Nighthawks both exploit the foraging opportunity created by artificial lights. Because the monument provided spatial perspective, we were also able to observe that bats and Common Nighthawks foraged at different heights, suggesting that they partitioned the available foraging space vertically.
>
>
>
>
> Foley and Wszola's conclusions make more sense to me than the idea that aggressive bats would chase off the nighthawks. I could (easily) be wrong, but perhaps what Dan observed was merely that the nighthawks were going for different species of nocturnal insects than were the bats, so they were in different places? (Bug) food for thought.
>
>
>
>
>
> Best,
>
>
> - Jon. Anderson
>
>
> OlyWA
>
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Thu, 31 May 2018 14:23:58 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Keith Carlson <kec201814...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] Possible nesting Loggerhead Shrike in Asotin
> County.
> To: inland nw birders <inland-nw-birders...>, Tweeters
> <tweeters...>
> Message-ID:
> <1855885548.15086847.1527791038674.JavaMail.zimbra...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> This AM, while searching unsuccessfully for the Sage Thrasher found yesterday by John Hanna, I found another Loggerhead Shrike.In the photo, it appears to have a bill full of hair which indicates to me a nest building attempt.There are loads of cattle in this area of grass and Sage. https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/42427739552/in/dateposted-public/ This bird was four miles from the Loggerhead Shrike my wife and I found 27 May. Loggerhead Shrike is a category 4 bird in Asotin County. Keith CarlsonLewiston
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 10
> Date: Thu, 31 May 2018 18:32:57 +0000 (UTC)
> From: cynthia burrell <cinnyb...>
> Subject: [Tweeters] WOS Member Photo Night June 4
> To: <tweeters...>
> Message-ID: <1238155428.781439.1527791577451...>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> Reminder that June 4 is the last WOS meeting this spring and it is member photo night! This is your chance to share some of your great birding moments with an audience of fellow birders. Bring photos on a thumb drive and keep your presentation less than 10 minutes.
> Center for Urban Horticulture 3501 NE 41st St, 7pm social, 7:30 meeting begins. Hope to see you there!
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
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> <Tweeters...>
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>
> End of Tweeters Digest, Vol 165, Issue 31
> *****************************************
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