Date: 5/14/18 7:25 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Re: Killing Black Vultures
I just want to say thanks to everyone who responded since this was both
informative and extremely interesting.  Much of this I did not know, and
I feel far better informed on the subject.


So - thanks to everyone!


George (n. Conway Co. keeping an eye on the Black Vultures behind the house)


On 5/14/2018 10:19 AM, Joseph C. Neal wrote:
>
> I too have some more I'd like to get off my chest, vis-a-vis this
> thread. If there is anything more that is relevant to Arkansas, and
> factual, probably ok to post that, but in honor our late friend
> list-owner Kimberly G. Smith, I'm going to STOP and hope most of you
> all can, too.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Gmail <butchchq8...>
> *Sent:* Monday, May 14, 2018 8:09:32 AM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Killing Black Vultures
> It does make one wonder.
>
> Is there a literature citation for the study regarding the efficacy of
> effigies?
>
> Honestly, the whole notion seems like a 13th century solution to a
> 21st century problem. Hopefully in the future, some brilliant
> scientist will come up with a more palatable solution for all concerned.
>
> I have faith in our collective brain power.
>
> Having said that, I will end my continuance of this thread before Joe
> tells me to!
>
> Thanks, Karen, for your insight into this difficult issue once again.
>
> Butch
>
> > On May 14, 2018, at 07:22, Karen And Jim Rowe
> <rollingrfarm...> wrote:
> >
> > An effigy is a taxidermy mount of a dead vulture hung in the roost
> or at the depredation site or damage area. Dead vultures simply hung
> without taxidermy have also been used, often more successfully however
> the expected smell, and fly issues occur and someone has to be the
> person get that type of effigy down as it decomposes.
> >
> > Dead vultures from a local roost or family group are supposedly more
> effective as effigies compared to a vulture from another vulture roost
> from many miles away. Raises the question are effigies of birds from
> their roost more effective because the vultures recognize the individual
> > as one from their “group”?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On May 13, 2018, at 8:48 PM, Gmail <butchchq8...> wrote:
> >>
> >> In this context, what exactly is an effigy?
> >>
> >>> On May 13, 2018, at 20:36, Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> I would think depredation of vultures, reinforced by effigies, may
> have a
> >>> stronger deterrent effect.
> >>>
> >>> The Eglin vultures (to my knowledge) weren't involved in
> vandalism, which
> >>> could offer a different reinforcement than just hangin' around.
> >>>
> >>> Jeff Short
> >>>
> >>> -----Original Message-----
> >>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> >>> [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Karen And Jim Rowe
> >>> Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 4:43 PM
> >>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> >>> Subject: Re: Killing Black Vultures
> >>>
> >>> Effigy use is a technique USDA-APHIS-WS uses in Arkansas at the
> vehicle
> >>> damage sites.  It has mixed results.
> >>>
> >>> A number of years ago, a woman from Heber Springs  sent me a video of
> >>> vultures tearing up, and tearing into, all the seat cushions on
> their party
> >>> barge.  From what I could see, no cushion was left intact.  I
> counted 9
> >>> Turkey Vultures involved in the activity.
> >>>
> >>> Karen
> >>>
> >>> Sent from my iPhone
> >>>
> >>>> On May 13, 2018, at 4:30 PM, Jeffrey Short
> <bashman...> wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>> One of my USAF colleagues ran a marina in So. California and he
> told me
> >>> about vultures tearing up his boat seats. First I had heard of
> that so some
> >>> property damage may occur.  Wonder if the off-gassing of plastic
> tends to
> >>> resemble garbage or dead animals??
> >>>>
> >>>> I would expect that some Black Vultures may be attracted to cattle,
> >>> especially sick or bloody areas.
> >>>>
> >>>> Eglin AFB used vulture effigies to keep them from using communication
> >>> towers as roost sites.
> >>>>
> >>>> Jeff Short
> >>>>
> >>>> -----Original Message-----
> >>>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> >>> [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman
> >>>> Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2018 12:43 PM
> >>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> >>>> Subject: Killing Black Vultures
> >>>>
> >>>> There's an article in the current (Spring 2018) Arkansas Agriculture
> >>>> magazine about Black Vultures by Keith Sutton.  It rehashes the
> usual
> >>>> stuff about them killing calves but goes on to talk about them
> tearing
> >>>> up vehicles, etc., which I've never heard (not that I hear
> much).  The
> >>>> article provides information on one form of non-lethal prevention
> >>>> (pyrotechnics, which gets about two sentences) then launches into an
> >>>> extended discussion about depredation permits and the need to relax
> >>>> regulations so people can pretty much kill them at leisure.
> >>>>
> >>>> So, questions:  Has anyone else seen this article?  If so, how
> much of
> >>>> it is valid and how much is just "agitating the base". Some of this
> >>>> seems rather over the top (like 50+ vultures mobbing a cow during
> >>>> delivery) and a lot seems more about weakening the Migratory Bird
> Act.
> >>>> The article does reference a statistic from the USDA on damage to
> cattle
> >>>> caused by vultures ($4.65 million/year) so it has the appearance of
> >>>> legitimacy.
> >>>>
> >>>> Before I go arguing the vultures' case (I happen to like Black
> Vultures,
> >>>> but haven't had to deal with them in numbers) I'd like solid and
> >>>> reliable information.
> >>>>
> >>>> Input anyone?
> >>>>
> >>>> Thanks
> >>>>
> >>>> George (n. Conway Co. with nesting vultures, but no roost and no
> cattle)
> >


 
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