Date: 4/30/18 4:36 pm
From: Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Loggerhead Shrike declines
Mac et al.-
Shrikes, Eastern Kingbirds, meadowlarks, Orchard Orioles, Common
Nighthawks all seem to be getting decimated in ag areas. Northern
Mockingbirds, Red-winged Blackbirds, etc. seem to be more resilient.
Would be an interesting project. Neonicotinoid pesticides are often
mentioned as a major contributing factor. Need more studies. Meanwhile,
shrikes are quickly approaching "Threatened" status.....

Steve Cardiff

On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 4:37 PM, Mac Myers <budogmacm...> wrote:

> How about Eastern Kingbirds? They appear to be in "normal" numbers once one
> gets to the southern edge of rice country, near the marsh interface, But in
> the rice country proper, it seems to me they have suffered drastic declines
> within the last ten years, mostly in the last five. Perhaps it is merely
> coincidental, but this is the same time period in which genetically
> modified, herbicide resistant (readily recognized because they are
> drill-planted in rows) rice varieties have come to dominate in the region.
> Fields of these rice varieties require far less water (formerly used to
> suppress weeds such as red rice) and appear to provide far less good
> habitat for shorebirds. Instead, the weeds are destroyed by the aerial
> application of herbicides (which the older rice varieties could not have
> withstood). Do these herbicides deplete the insect prey base? Are these
> herbicides finding their way into insect populations and subsequently into
> kingbirds, shrikes, and meadowlarks? It may be mere coincidence, but it
> might be worth investigating.
>
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> On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 1:03 PM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:
>
> > I looked for an all-day April rice country list from 1980s and turned up
> > my 1988 list from northern Vermilion Par., literally on the other side of
> > Bayou Queue de Tortue from Saturday’s list:
> >
> > 126 Loggerhead Shrikes in 60 miles.
> >
> > Also 2 Bobwhites and 94 E. Meadowlarks — more signs of times gone bye-bye
> >
> >
> > ===================
> >
> > Dr. J. V. Remsen
> > Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> > Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> > LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> > najames<at>LSU.edu
> >
> > > On Apr 30, 2018, at 12:07 PM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:
> > >
> > > LABIRD: indeed, very scary. Based on birds/road mile in the late
> 1980s,
> > I should have had at least 1 pair per mile in ag habitat. i.e. about 40
> on
> > my ebird lists totals for the sites with good habitat. I had 4 birds. I
> > don’t remember any others in the between-site intervals either, which
> would
> > have doubled my mileage had I kept track of birds. It is sad to think
> that
> > back in the 80s and 90s, we thought that our dense rice-country
> populations
> > were immune to whatever was causing declines elsewhere in USA.
> > >
> > > ===================
> > >
> > > Dr. J. V. Remsen
> > > Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> > > Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> > > LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> > > najames<at>LSU.edu
> > >
> > >> On Apr 30, 2018, at 11:48 AM, Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
> > wrote:
> > >>
> > >> How many Loggerhead Shrikes?
> > >>
> > >> Donna and I cruised through Jeff DAvis on Friday afternoon and
> Saturday
> > and had zero shrikes. Finally saw a few along Rossignol and Fruge and
> then
> > they are somewhat more conspicuous along the immediate coast. Scary.
> > >>
> > >> Steve Cardiff
> > >>
> > >> On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 11:29 AM, James V Remsen <najames...>
> > wrote:
> > >> LABIRD: Given the unusually high number of land bird migrants inland
> in
> > Louisiana, I decided to spend Saturday looking for them in Acadia and
> Jeff
> > Davis parishes, both of which suffer from sampling artifacts in terms of
> > few records of land bird migrants. As just one example, Jeff. Davis has
> no
> > spring record of Magnolia or Am. Redstart!
> > >>
> > >> As expected, volume was low. Quality, however, made up for that in
> > terms of a male Cerulean Warbler, 1 Philadelphia and 1 Warbling Vireo,
> and
> > 1 Scissor-tailed in Acadia, and Chestnut-sideds in both Acadia and Jeff.
> > Davis.
> > >>
> > >> Additional migrants: INBU 8, Red-eyed 7, Catbird 6, Blue Grosbeak 5,
> > Rose-breasted Grosbeak 4, Summer Tanager 4, Baltimore Oriole 3, 2 each of
> > Ruby-throat, Acadian F., Swainson’s Thrush, Wood Thrush, Black-and-white,
> > and singles of Tennessee, Yellow W., Chat, Scarlet Tanager, Orchard
> > Oriole. If I’d been able to get out there a couple of days earlier,
> > warbler totals would likely have been higher.
> > >>
> > >> Also of minor interest: a likely new Cave Swallow breeding site in
> > southern Acadia.
> > >>
> > >> Shorebirds: remarkably scarce, as has been my impression all spring.
> > As noted by Matt and others, good habitat is increasingly scarce, but
> even
> > fields that looked like they should be loaded were nearly devoid of
> birds.
> > >>
> > >> Van Remsen
> > >>
> > >> ===================
> > >>
> > >> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> > >> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> > >> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> > >> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> > >> najames<at>LSU.edu
> > >>
> > >>
> > >
> >
> >
>
 
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