Date: 4/30/18 10:07 am
From: James V Remsen <najames...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Loggerhead Shrike declines
LABIRD: indeed, very scary. Based on birds/road mile in the late 1980s, I should have had at least 1 pair per mile in ag habitat. i.e. about 40 on my ebird lists totals for the sites with good habitat. I had 4 birds. I don’t remember any others in the between-site intervals either, which would have doubled my mileage had I kept track of birds. It is sad to think that back in the 80s and 90s, we thought that our dense rice-country populations were immune to whatever was causing declines elsewhere in USA.

===================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najames<at>LSU.edu

> On Apr 30, 2018, at 11:48 AM, Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> wrote:
>
> How many Loggerhead Shrikes?
>
> Donna and I cruised through Jeff DAvis on Friday afternoon and Saturday and had zero shrikes. Finally saw a few along Rossignol and Fruge and then they are somewhat more conspicuous along the immediate coast. Scary.
>
> Steve Cardiff
>
> On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 11:29 AM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:
> LABIRD: Given the unusually high number of land bird migrants inland in Louisiana, I decided to spend Saturday looking for them in Acadia and Jeff Davis parishes, both of which suffer from sampling artifacts in terms of few records of land bird migrants. As just one example, Jeff. Davis has no spring record of Magnolia or Am. Redstart!
>
> As expected, volume was low. Quality, however, made up for that in terms of a male Cerulean Warbler, 1 Philadelphia and 1 Warbling Vireo, and 1 Scissor-tailed in Acadia, and Chestnut-sideds in both Acadia and Jeff. Davis.
>
> Additional migrants: INBU 8, Red-eyed 7, Catbird 6, Blue Grosbeak 5, Rose-breasted Grosbeak 4, Summer Tanager 4, Baltimore Oriole 3, 2 each of Ruby-throat, Acadian F., Swainson’s Thrush, Wood Thrush, Black-and-white, and singles of Tennessee, Yellow W., Chat, Scarlet Tanager, Orchard Oriole. If I’d been able to get out there a couple of days earlier, warbler totals would likely have been higher.
>
> Also of minor interest: a likely new Cave Swallow breeding site in southern Acadia.
>
> Shorebirds: remarkably scarce, as has been my impression all spring. As noted by Matt and others, good habitat is increasingly scarce, but even fields that looked like they should be loaded were nearly devoid of birds.
>
> Van Remsen
>
> ===================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najames<at>LSU.edu
>
>

 
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