Date: 1/22/18 10:40 am
From: Christopher Hill (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed
I was once playing softball on a dirt field in Puerto Rico, with a chicken or two wandering around, and a Peregrine Falcon came in and went after one of the chickens. Didn’t get it.

But still, it’s usually Cooper’s.

I wonder how much of the decline in band recoveries is due to fewer hawks being shot, and how much is due to the people who shoot them no longer reporting the bands.

One more anecdote I have shared here before - I salvage birds to skin and stuff for the teaching collection here at Coastal Carolina University. I once picked up a very freshly car-killed adult Cooper’s. When I was skinning it I discovered it had bird shot embedded in its breast muscle (healed, encapsulated). So it had been shot, survived that, and then eventually got hit by a car. Humans.

Chris Hill
Conway, SC


> On Jan 22, 2018, at 1:15 PM, Helmut Mueller <helmutmueller...> wrote:
>
> In my many years of banding hawks & owls, I recall twice finding chicken remains in red-tail nests & several cases of nests above an area in which chickens roamed. We also banded a lot of Red-tails trapped during fall migration & in the 1950’s, ca 10% of the Red-tails were recovered in the first year, with almost all being shot. In the 1990’s less than 1% were recovered in the first year after banding. I attribute this to the educational effects of TV & rehab centers. I also no of 2 cases of Cooper’s nesting in a woods where chickens frequented. Those of you who are on the CBC field trip to Cuba will remember a Gundlach’s Hawk nest in a wood frequented by chickens. The species is a very close relative of the Cooper’s. I also remember a Wilson Ornithological Society Meeting where a chicken farmer told me of his bird feeder, on which he placed his dead chickens & they were taken by Red-tails.
>
> Helmut C. Mueller
> Professor Emeritus
> Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology
> University of North Carolina
> Chapel Hill, NC 27599
> 919-942-4937
> <hmueller...>
>
>
>
>> On Jan 22, 2018, at 12:31 PM, Weiskotten, Kurt <kweiskotten...> wrote:
>>
>> Here in NY, I have raised free range chickens for 10 years. They are kept in a coop or fenced yard when no one is home.
>> The vast majority of my chicken loss has been from Coopers Hawks. Of course I have plenty of bird feeders that bring them around more often, but hey hawks need to eat too! Red tails abound as well, but they have never taken a chicken, although I'm sure they do elsewhere. Occasionally, a grey fox gets one, and rarely a coyote. But I would never shoot a hawk - it is after all against the law - without a permit. If these people are raising chickens as a living and for income then they should pursue the nuisance predator route. Otherwise hawk kills are part of owning chickens.
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
>>
>> ------ Original message------
>> From: Millis, Tracy
>> Date: Mon, Jan 22, 2018 12:15 PM
>> To: <carolinabirds...>;
>> Cc:
>> Subject:RE: Hawks being shot and killed
>>
>> I wouldn’t be surprised if coyotes were the major culprit in the disappearances of the farmer’s chickens, not hawks.
>>
>> Tracy L. Millis
>> Chapel Hill, NC
>>
>> From: <carolinabirds-request...> [mailto:<carolinabirds-request...>] On Behalf Of Christopher Hill
>> Sent: Monday, January 22, 2018 11:52 AM
>> To: birds <carolinabirds...>
>> Subject: Re: Hawks being shot and killed
>>
>> Also, for what it’s worth, it’s often Cooper’s Hawks taking the chickens. The Cooper’s Hawks, appear, grab one, take off, as Cooper’s Hawks are wont to do. The chicken owners see a Red-tail and shoot it because they’re big and obvious. But not always the guilty party, in fact usually not.
>>
>> Chris Hill
>> Conway, SC
>>
>> On Jan 22, 2018, at 11:02 AM, <scompton1251...> wrote:
>>
>> Teri Lynn,
>>
>> Studies done in the 30's showed that Red-tailed Hawks and other birds of prey are a net benefit to domestic fowl, as they prefer rodents and control rodent populations that prey on eggs. While law enforcement can be used as a last resort the better method is to provide the farmer with education.
>> The Clemson Extension agent could be helpful.
>>
>> Steve Compton
>> Greenville, SC
>>
>> -----------------------------------------
>> From: "Herbert, Teri Lynn" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
>> To: "Carolinabirds Listserve"
>> Cc:
>> Sent: 22-Jan-2018 15:25:39 +0000
>> Subject: Hawks being shot and killed
>>
>>
>> I know it is illegal to kill birds of prey. I met some people living out
>> in the country this weekend whose chickens are being taken by the red
>> tailed hawks; they are free range chickens, so are out and about all the
>> time. This is in Georgetown County near Williamsburg County. They stated
>> that they have shot several red tails in the past few weeks to try and
>> save their chickens. But there are still hawks taking the chickens. (I
>> saw, heard two while there).
>>
>> I suggested keeping chickens penned, getting a Great Pyrenees dog (like
>> my goat farm lady uses to protect her chickens, which are penned). I also
>> pointed out that killing hawks was illegal, but it didn¹t seem to bother
>> them. I was quite distraught.
>> I don¹t know the names of farmers, but what can be done about this?
>>
>> Thanks for any advice.
>>
>> Teri Lynn
>> back in Charleston now
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
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