Date: 1/7/18 3:30 pm
From: Brian Patteson (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Winter movement of Killdeer
There are presently many more here on Hatteras Island than usual. I haven’t been north of Buxton for days, but they are pretty much everywhere there is open ground west of the Cape. While this is not Bermuda, we are well east of the mainland.

Brian Patteson
Hatteras, NC

> On Jan 7, 2018, at 6:19 PM, Kent Fiala (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Regarding winter movements of shorebirds, Kenn Kaufmann has just posted on Facebook an interesting comparison of Killdeer in Bermuda.
>
> Killdeer in Bermuda, all month of January 2017 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_map_killde-3Fneg-3Dtrue-26env.minX-3D-2D65-26env.minY-3D32.2-26env.maxX-3D-2D64.5-26env.maxY-3D32.4-26zh-3Dtrue-26gp-3Dfalse-26ev-3DZ-26mr-3Don-26bmo-3D1-26emo-3D1-26yr-3Drange-26byr-3D2017-26eyr-3D2017&d=DwMCaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DNSMlbMUufVi9oq8x4Ki_1Ddf5ejVGOObXWjMXnzBZ4&s=scn34BRBXgS1CIMOUzm1aEhlUCxkbZ6eghNRrLjbXt0&e=>
> Killdeer in Bermuda, first days of January 2018 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__ebird.org_ebird_map_killde-3Fneg-3Dtrue-26env.minX-3D-2D65-26env.minY-3D32.2-26env.maxX-3D-2D64.5-26env.maxY-3D32.4-26zh-3Dtrue-26gp-3Dfalse-26ev-3DZ-26mr-3Don-26bmo-3D1-26emo-3D1-26yr-3Drange-26byr-3D2018-26eyr-3D2018&d=DwMCaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=DNSMlbMUufVi9oq8x4Ki_1Ddf5ejVGOObXWjMXnzBZ4&s=Lw1143rqp1Zg7uLfBImEC6M0d98rpKomliVdGjlEIUw&e=>
> He speculates this is due to the cold weather:
> "Any that got offshore would have been picked up by the powerful wind
> circulation around the intense storm that moved north off the Atlantic
> Coast in recent days. Once the Killdeers were out over the water, many
> probably just continued to fly downwind until they sighted Bermuda, and
> many of them probably flew more than 800 miles southeastward before
> winding up there. The phenomenon brings to mind accounts of another
> plover, the Northern Lapwing, responding to extreme winter conditions in
> Europe by making hard-weather movements westward to the coast and
> beyond."
>
> --
> Kent Fiala


 
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