Date: 1/7/18 2:42 pm
From: Nate Dias (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Woodcock moving to the coast during winter storms
I think the things like we are witnessing again and various people
have written about over the years is "already-wintering-in-coastal
plain" Woodcock temporarily moving towards the immediate coast in
search of ground they can feed in.

Since the immediate coast (edge of mainland and islands) is a
comparatively narrow band, this would tend to concentrate the
Woodcock.

Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC

On Sun, Jan 7, 2018 at 10:26 AM, Brian Patteson
<patteson1...> wrote:
> My personal experience in VA indicates that they do at least undertake short
> distance movements southward in response to freezing weather. I have seen
> hundreds within minutes in a small area at the tip of the Delmarva peninsula
> during a big cold snap. They are a common bird in the woods up there, but
> not in the density we observed following that ice storm several years ago.
>
> I also have doubts about them moving eastward en masse in response to cold
> weather.
>
> Brian Patteson
> Hatteras, NC
>
> On Jan 7, 2018, at 10:12 AM, John Connors (via carolinabirds Mailing List)
> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
> Sheryl, I agree with you, I don't think we can ascribe mass movements of
> inland woodcock to the coast.
> It is possible that woodcock would follow river courses eastward since they
> will often concentrate their feeding near flowing water when the ground is
> frozen, but we don't know that they do this. Northern birds may move farther
> south when heavy winter weather freezes the north.
> But Woodcock have always concentrated in the coastal plain of NC during
> winter- that has been known for decades- and most of these birds are from
> northern breeding populations. Woodcock that breed in the Piedmont and
> Mountains of NC may be permanent residents- the fact that they occupy
> courtship grounds in warm winter weather across those regions suggest that
> at least some do.
> Back in the late 1970s when we were studying woodcock in winter near Lake
> Mattamuskeet my colleague Tim Stamps found spring peeper frogs in the
> stomachs of woodcock during a particularly hard freeze. The birds move to
> seeps, small streams, river banks and sunny spots where soils melt and
> worms, and frogs/salamanders become accessible. That much we do know.
> John Connors
> Raleigh, NC
>
> On Sun, Jan 7, 2018 at 7:50 AM, Sheryl McNair <carolinabirds...>
> wrote:
>>
>> Something doesn't seem right about this explanation. Having done Woodcock
>> surveys in the NC mountains in early Feb., I'm not sure I understand why
>> they would move to the coast in an ice/snow storm. There are plenty of
>> those in the mountains, and the Woodcocks are still there. I think it far
>> more likely that coastal Woodcocks head to the sun in these unusually frigid
>> conditions, and then are far more visible than usual. But, things in the
>> natural world don't always make sense.
>>
>> Sheryl
>>
>>
>> ________________________________
>> From: Nate Dias <carolinabirds...>
>> To: CarolinaBirds <carolinabirds...>
>> Cc: Greg Massey <gmassey001...>; Harry LeGrand
>> <hlegrandjr...>
>> Sent: Saturday, January 6, 2018 3:45 PM
>> Subject: Re: Woodcock moving to the coast during winter storms
>>
>> Here is a photo (shot through my mother's kitchen window) of one of the
>> January 2014 "refugees"
>>
>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.flickr.com_photos_offshorebirder2_12242939&d=DwIBaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=c2XYFWQcAyTuG8V-IcuoU-8fapPxmw8Qv7VBPlVTN9M&s=md2sSgk6Xsk9oNh9GcXxKQIhrXgTgQc916RRd2dYW7U&e=
>> 956/in/photostream/lightbox/
>>
>> flickr.com/photos/offshorebirder2/12242939956/in/photostream/lightbox/
>>
>> -- No worries Harry - Woodcock are strange sometimes counter-intuitive
>> creatures. I read of one banded as a March nestling in
>> Alabama that was harvested by a hunter in Michigan the following October!
>>
>> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC< /div>
>>
>> On Saturday, January 6, 2018, Greg Massey <gmassey001...> wrote:
>>
>> During the ice and snow storm in the 1/30/2014 period, over 200 Woodcock
>> were reported at Oak Island, NC. This was documented by numerous observers
>> and I personally saw over 25 birds in one hour on 1/31/2014, along with
>> other birders. Jamie Adams reported 50 on his 2/01/2014 eBird report. Most
>> of the state was covered with snow, and these birds were pushed to their
>> limits. They were in yards, concrete driveways, ditches, almost anywhere.
>>
>>
>>
>> Greg Massey
>> Leland,NC 28451
>>
>> ---- ""Nate Dias" (via carolinabirds Mailing List)"
>> <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>> Typo - 1892 not 1893.
>>
>> On Saturday, January 6, 2018, Nate Dias <offshorebirder...> wrote:
>>
>> > Exactly Guy. Woodcock move to the coast en masse during certain snow
>> > and
>> > ice storms, showing up in very unusual environs.
>> >
>> > This has been documented and published about since Arthur T. Wayne's day
>> > and before.
>> >
>> > Here is one of Wayne's notes on the subject describing thousands of
>> > Woodcock falling out in Mt. Pleasant, SC following a snow/ice/sleet
>> > storm
>> > in late December 1893:
>> >
>> > sora.unm.edu/sites/default/ files/journals/auk/v010n02/ p0204-p0204.pdf
>> >
>> >
>> > Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>> >
>> > On Saturday, January 6, 2018, <badgerboy...> wrote:
>> >
>> >> I thought I read on this list a couple years ago about massive woodcock
>> >> movements to the coast in cold snaps. My recollection is that people
>> >> had
>> >> reported large numbers of them and they thought the birds were NOT
>> >> normal
>> >> locally overwintering birds but rather that the sudden cold had pushed
>> >> much
>> >> higher numbers than normal into the coastal areas. Could have been a
>> >> faulty
>> >> memory though--anyone else remember this?
>> >>
>> >> Thanks, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> On 1/4/2018 9:58 PM, Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>> >>
>> >>> First, a reminder that it's unethical, not to mention even illegal
>> >>> under
>> >>> the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, to capture and/or harass any raptor or
>> >>> any
>> >>> other native bird, regardless of the status of domestic livestock.
>> >>>
>> >>> I also had an American Woodcock as a yard bird tonight in Harbinger,
>> >>> NC.
>> >>> A Baltimore Oriole was just down the street. The Albermarle Sound was
>> >>> way
>> >>> more active than usual today, although nothing was regionally unusual.
>> >>> Most
>> >>> entertaining were Wilson's Snipe, Greater Yellowlegs, Dunlin,
>> >>> Killdeer,
>> >>> American Pipit, and Song Sparrows all foraging together on ice balls
>> >>> and a
>> >>> very tiny, sandy beach patch in the backyard.
>> >>>
>> >>> Has anyone else had frozen hummingbird casualties this week? One
>> >>> (RTHU)
>> >>> was hanging upside down on my feeder the morning of New Years Eve that
>> >>> I
>> >>> thought was in torpor, but it fell off two days later and did not wake
>> >>> up.
>> >>>
>> >>> Steve Ritt
>> >>> Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA
>> >>> (...hoping my next yard bird will be a Nazca Booby tomorrow.)
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >>
>
>
 
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