Date: 1/6/18 12:11 pm
From: Diane Midness (via carolinabirds Mailing List) <carolinabirds...>
Subject: Re: Woodcock moving to the coast during winter storms
Over 30 Woodcocks were seen within a few hours in Oriental this afternoon.
I posted something to the Natural Pamlico Facebook group and have had
several people answer they are seeing them in their back yards. It is not
uncommon to see groups of 5 or 6. I am glad Oriental is a Bird Sanctuary!

Diane Midness

On Sat, Jan 6, 2018 at 2:45 PM, Harry LeGrand <carolinabirds...>
wrote:

> Yep -- I stand corrected on the Woodcock coastal movements. Yes, I did
> recall reading about a few of them, I think around Ocracoke Island a few
> years ago there was a notable one. In places like that, it would be
> obvious that there is a movement, when folks are seeing 10 or more in a day
> during daytime. In a place like Oriental, back from the coast, it might be
> a bit harder to tell, especially if people are only noticing one or two in
> their yards. Folks like Nate and John F. have the advantage of living in
> coastal cities and towns and can directly witness this. We don't get
> Woodcock fallouts here in the Triangle or other places in the Piedmont, or
> at least they are not noticeable.
>
> Harry LeGrand
> Raleigh
>
> On Sat, Jan 6, 2018 at 2:19 PM, Nate Dias <carolinabirds...> wrote:
>
>> Typo - 1892 not 1893.
>>
>>
>> On Saturday, January 6, 2018, Nate Dias <offshorebirder...> wrote:
>>
>>> Exactly Guy. Woodcock move to the coast en masse during certain snow
>>> and ice storms, showing up in very unusual environs.
>>>
>>> This has been documented and published about since Arthur T. Wayne's day
>>> and before.
>>>
>>> Here is one of Wayne's notes on the subject describing thousands of
>>> Woodcock falling out in Mt. Pleasant, SC following a snow/ice/sleet storm
>>> in late December 1893:
>>>
>>> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__sora.unm.edu_sites_default_files_journals_auk_v010n0&d=DwIFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=vwDXg_z67xp2RdQvFV3rsSuogHXuO9uwS2UmLqOnAtQ&s=pdMp4ix3ZDyVJck0ADrggZ2VV1eGtJLGYFUTAUSLovE&e=
>>> 2/p0204-p0204.pdf
>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__sora.unm.edu_sites_default_files_journals_auk_v010n02_p0204-2Dp0204.pdf&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uK5ljFBmGobFvcU7yAPG5vrXjcPKsYxsbQPpsrDcM_c&s=gkOhGEyc0ifEhUA8HRVFcTIh4Xc2MwbIxB9WNb6nizM&e=>
>>>
>>> sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/auk/v010n02/p0204-p0204.pdf
>>> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__sora.unm.edu_sites_default_files_journals_auk_v010n02_p0204-2Dp0204.pdf&d=DwMFaQ&c=imBPVzF25OnBgGmVOlcsiEgHoG1i6YHLR0Sj_gZ4adc&r=ymRCw6Q-sBitug_rdeO1Tokz-I_SX2LQN2_Ocvlal9U&m=uK5ljFBmGobFvcU7yAPG5vrXjcPKsYxsbQPpsrDcM_c&s=JZvFOY-pfA9s6WqG3DdHYaM5D0iztqWDPxyVsXMXKl0&e=>
>>>
>>>
>>> Nathan Dias - Charleston, SC
>>>
>>> On Saturday, January 6, 2018, <badgerboy...> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I thought I read on this list a couple years ago about massive woodcock
>>>> movements to the coast in cold snaps. My recollection is that people had
>>>> reported large numbers of them and they thought the birds were NOT normal
>>>> locally overwintering birds but rather that the sudden cold had pushed much
>>>> higher numbers than normal into the coastal areas. Could have been a faulty
>>>> memory though--anyone else remember this?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks, Guy McGrane, Deep Gap, NC
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 1/4/2018 9:58 PM, Steve Ritt (via carolinabirds Mailing List) wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> First, a reminder that it's unethical, not to mention even illegal
>>>>> under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, to capture and/or harass any raptor or
>>>>> any other native bird, regardless of the status of domestic livestock.
>>>>>
>>>>> I also had an American Woodcock as a yard bird tonight in Harbinger,
>>>>> NC. A Baltimore Oriole was just down the street. The Albermarle Sound was
>>>>> way more active than usual today, although nothing was regionally unusual.
>>>>> Most entertaining were Wilson's Snipe, Greater Yellowlegs, Dunlin,
>>>>> Killdeer, American Pipit, and Song Sparrows all foraging together on ice
>>>>> balls and a very tiny, sandy beach patch in the backyard.
>>>>>
>>>>> Has anyone else had frozen hummingbird casualties this week? One
>>>>> (RTHU) was hanging upside down on my feeder the morning of New Years Eve
>>>>> that I thought was in torpor, but it fell off two days later and did not
>>>>> wake up.
>>>>>
>>>>> Steve Ritt
>>>>> Harbinger, NC / San Diego, CA
>>>>> (...hoping my next yard bird will be a Nazca Booby tomorrow.)
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>

 
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