Date: 1/4/18 2:28 pm
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: [obol] Fwd: Re: Horned Larks in the Willamette Valley
Here is the final Horned Lark High Count Table, as amended by others.

*High Counts of Horned Larks Willamette Valley (Compiled from eBird, Bob
Obrien)*



Clark

27

Andrea Johnson

01/23/17



Multnomah

150

Greg Gillson

01/11/03

(from CBC data)

Clackamas

10

Aaron Beerman

07/19/17

~100 ~2005 Me

Marion

30

Kathleen Moon

02/23/12



Linn

320

Randy Moore

11/26/15



Lane

43

Tom Mickel

01/25/04



Douglas

1

Jimmy Bilstone

02/06/15



Jackson

41

Russ Namitz

01/30/16



On Tue, Jan 2, 2018 at 6:28 PM, Ashwin S. <orfrigatebird...> wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> For what it's worth, the high count for Horned Lark in Multnomah County is
> 150 on 1/11/2003 by Greg Gillson, at the Rivergate Industrial Area.
> Washington County has had an insignificant number of larks over the last
> few decades, never more than a few individuals, and probably northern
> subspecies (not aware of any Streaked HOLA breeding in Washington County
> currently).
>
> Multnomah County is unusual in that (almost?) all Streaked HOLA breeding
> occurs off agricultural land. The two significant locations are the
> Rivergate Industrial Area, where large numbers of larks have wintered, and
> the Portland Airport area. The number of larks at Rivergate has steadily
> declined over the last few years, but there are still several breeding
> pairs there. Unfortunately, the Port of Portland has permission to develop
> all sites at Rivergate in the new future (within ~5 years). The USFWS held
> a public comment period last winter on whether or not to allow this, and I
> did write to them in disagreement, but this seemed to have no effect on the
> decision.
>
> The PDX area will naturally become more important if sites at Rivergate
> are destroyed. Broughton Beach just north of PDX hosts relatively large
> numbers of larks, especially during the fall. Last November I had a flock
> of 12 Streaked HOLAs there. Broughton Beach is, however, transitioning out
> of suitability for larks as willows are starting to take root. I have no
> idea how this will affect lark populations in the airport area, but
> probably negatively, as this is a location safe from airplanes and with
> plenty of food on the water's edge. Personally, I think most larks at the
> airport use Broughton Beach for feeding at least seasonally, but this has
> no grounding in scientific observation.
>
> There is an ongoing effort by Metro to transform the former St. Johns Dump
> just south of Smith and Bybee Lakes into a prairie. From the photos I've
> seen, the results thus far have been impressive, and there have been some
> visiting larks there from time to time. However, Streaked HOLAs are
> notorious for extreme site-fidelity. It is dubitable that larks will
> colonize the location before sites at Rivergate are destroyed, but one can
> only hope.
>
> Ashwin S.
> Beaverton
>

 
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