Date: 11/12/17 2:03 pm
From: Nathaniel Wander <nw105...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Crow playing with feathers
I don't have a specific explanation of that crow's behavior, but according to Lawrence Kilham's The American Crow and the Common Raven, crows like to play, to play with objects and to play with each other using objects.  He found this to be particularly true of yearlings, and many of the behaviors he describes appear to show the birds exploring objects, their physical capabilities--as with bills and claws--and their relationships with each other.  They are also known to use objects to solicit copulatory behavior and seemingly to tease other species.  Kilham makes crow 'play' sound like it performs many of the same functions we identify in mammals, particularly in the young.
Nathaniel WanderPortland, OR
Max Planck is supposed to have said: A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and        making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die        and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it.Andreas Wagner observed of Planck's remark: Science, like nature, advances one funeral at a time.  (Arrival of the Fittest, p.197)

On Friday, November 10, 2017, 7:02:59 PM PST, Timothy Steeves <timothydsteeves...> wrote:


Off the topic, but I saw a crow in my yard today pick up a scrub jay feather and continuosly call while holding it in its beak and repatedly placing it on the ground to draw attention.  The other crow near by paid no attention, but I was fascinated by what the crow with the feather was trying to convey.  I know crows are very protective of their own, but why would a crow display this kind of behavior over a scrub jay feather?  Any thoughts?
Tim
On Nov 9, 2017 9:50 AM, "Nathaniel Wander" <nw105...> wrote:

Do crows mob gulls?  About 4pm yesterday, there were at least two dozen crows calling vigorously from the roofs of my apartment building and/or the air space above them.  Search as I would, I couldn't find a raptor but two Glaucous-winged kept circling above.
Nathaniel WanderPortland, OR
Max Planck is supposed to have said: A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and        making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die        and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it.Andreas Wagner observed of Planck's remark: Science, like nature, advances one funeral at a time.  (Arrival of the Fittest, p.197)

 
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