Date: 10/28/17 6:51 pm
From: Jon King <jonking030...>
Subject: Red Crossbill types
> Hello all,
>
> As many of you may know, there are ten distinct types of Red Crossbill per current knowledge. Identification is based primarily upon voice, although bill size can hint at the correct identification. Each of these types may be elevated to full species status in the not too distant future, and one of them (Cassia Crossbill) was recognized as a unique species this summer.
>
> Our understanding of the status and distribution of each type is limited at this time, so any record that can be identified to type is of great interest. For this reason, please attempt to record any Red Crossbill you encounter in the coming months and upload your recordings to eBird. No special recording equipment is necessary. A simple video taken with your smartphone will do as long as the calls are audible.
>
> Based upon recordings and sight records from the last invasion (i.e. 2012-2013), at least four types have been documented in Kansas. Type 2 predominated that season and several type 3 were recorded as well. A single type 4 and type 5 were recorded at Hays, and if split, might constitute first state records. In general it seems that type 2 is the most common throughout the southern plains region. They may only be "types" now, but they are worth recording. You may find a first county or state record that will be recognized as such in the future, once the taxonomists do their thing.
>
> For a summary of crossbill call types and sample recordings, the following link is helpful. Again, please post recordings to eBird as they are of little use to people studying this invasion and others, if they remain on your personal devices only.
>
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/recrtype/
>
> I should also mention that there are many (dozens) of crossbill specimens in the KU collection. Unfortunately identification based solely on morphology is inconclusive, so no one is really sure what most of these were. Historical accounts (Goss, others) indicate that big billed types (e.g. type 2) were most common however, and that small billed types occurred less frequently. As for this year's invasion Chris Hobbs heard what was probably a two if I remember correctly, and Andrew Burnett's recording is also of a type two.
>
> Jon King
> Lawrence, KS
>
> Sent from my iPhone



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