Date: 3/15/17 9:43 am
From: 'James Tyler Bell' via Maryland & DC Birding <mdbirding...>
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] slow release, my 2 cents
OK, let's think about this. You either find a rare bird or hear about it somehow. How do you spread the word? Here are two scenarios. Kelp Gull shows up on the pier at a seafood restaurant with adequate parking. The folks at the restaurant are notified and are fine with the word going out publicly. Emails go out about the location and a full color photo shows up on the Saturday Washington Post Metro section. The bird sticks around for 6 years and literally thousands of people come to see it, many eating at the restaurant. Easy peasy.

Second scenario. Jim Stasz finds a Calliope Hummingbird at his house. He says to come by and even has chairs set out for people to sit in while waiting. There's tons of parking nearby. In this case, the homeowner found the bird, posted the location and is fine with unrestricted access. Problem solved.

Next scenario. Rufous Hummingbird shows up at your neighbor's house. The feeder is only visible from their backyard. They don't want lots of people to see it but are fine with a trickle. Now what? First, county birders get to see it. Then what? How do you control access when the homeowners specifically restrict the number. Seriously, how would you determine who next to allow to visit?

There's no simple answer to allowing access to a rarity. Every situation is different. Being a contact person for a rarity sucks. I don't wish it on anyone.

Tyler Bell
<jtylerbell...>
California, Maryland



________________________________
From: Barbara Sollers <dbsollers61...>
To: Rick Borchelt <rborchelt...>
Cc: Patricia Valdata <pvaldata1...>; Maryland Birding <mdbirding...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 11:53 AM
Subject: Re: [MDBirding] slow release, my 2 cents



I agree with Rick's comments completely! Especially with his final sentence. In general I find the Maryland birding community to be extremely helpful in sharing information. I have ALWAYS gotten an immediate reply either in person or through email when I have asked a question.

That being said, I find it interesting that the "elite" members of the MD birding community always get early access to rarity species while those of us who are not among the upper echelon of birders have to wait significantly longer for announcements. I would match my birding ethics with anyone else in the state! This does cause a bit of frustration at times.

Just my thoughts!

Good Birding,

Duvall Sollers
Hereford, MD

Sent from my iPad

On Mar 15, 2017, at 10:51 AM, Rick Borchelt <rborchelt...> wrote:


I think Pat's point -- and one made well in the posted guidelines -- is that the process of selecting who finds out and when needs to be transparent and transparently fair. Having much experience with rare and local butterflies along the same lines, this is easier said than done, but having the commitment to fairness and transparency and communicating that commitment often and widely goes a long way to soothing hurt feelings of disenfranchisement. People need to feel they have some reasonable expectation of being informed at some point.
>
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>On Wed, Mar 15, 2017 at 10:29 AM, Patricia Valdata <pvaldata1...> wrote:
>
>As a homeowner I understand the need for slow release of a rare bird's location, but I think it should be done so that local birders get the news first. In the case of this Painted Bunting, I would hope that members of the Harford Bird Club were the first to be notified about this bird.
>>
>>When the Green Violet-ear Hummingbird was in Elkton years ago, there were a lot of hard feelings because that bird's location was given to only one member of the Cecil Bird Club. It seemed unfair that birders from other states were told of that exceptional rarity when birders who lived within a few minutes of this bird were not told it was there until after it had left the area.
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>>
>>
>>Pat Valdata
>>Crisfield, Somerset County
>>
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>Rick Borchelt
>College Park, MD
>preferred personal email: rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com
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>http://leplog.wordpress.com
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