Date: 3/13/17 3:18 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again)
I caught a couple of simple suggestions on a PBS program as to how we public can improve our democracy and protect our birds- the first was to call our congressmen every week to comment of issues of concern to us; the second was to be proactive in selecting our representatives (rather than letting them be chosen by the major parties).  I think both are good ideas.
(Incidentally, while not precisely about birds, I do plan to call my Representative and ask that he vote NO on HR 610 - which begins to demolish public education.  I include this as an example of a call.  There are MANY.)


From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 8, 2017 10:48 PM
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again)

For many people picking up the phone and calling a legislator is outright scary.  -much easier to get people to write than phone.
I've had this half formed idea for a mini drama skit in which a student must make a call to his or her legislator the next morning.  This might be part of a project or some injustice the child has observed.   Being very nervous the student falls asleep and has a nightmare about the process.  The receptionist at the legislator's office is incredible rude, etc.  
In the morning full of fear the phone call is made and of course, it turns out to be a very pleasant experience.Even thought it might be possible for a real legislative office to role play with it. Or the whole thing could be ad lib with details written by different drama groups.  The efforts could be filmed and sent in and/or there could be a contest with the winning group(s) presenting for the fall AAS Saturday afternoon workshop.  I'm thinking kids might add some humor take some of the fear out of it for adults.   -probably will never get around to doing this.
Jack

On Tuesday, March 7, 2017 6:28 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:


#yiv8428503880 -- filtered {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;}#yiv8428503880 filtered {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}#yiv8428503880 filtered {font-family:Tahoma;panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}#yiv8428503880 filtered {panose-1:2 5 6 4 5 5 5 2 2 4;}#yiv8428503880 filtered {font-family:helveticaneue;}#yiv8428503880 filtered {}#yiv8428503880 p.yiv8428503880MsoNormal, #yiv8428503880 li.yiv8428503880MsoNormal, #yiv8428503880 div.yiv8428503880MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv8428503880 a:link, #yiv8428503880 span.yiv8428503880MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv8428503880 a:visited, #yiv8428503880 span.yiv8428503880MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv8428503880 p {margin-right:0in;margin-left:0in;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv8428503880 p.yiv8428503880MsoAcetate, #yiv8428503880 li.yiv8428503880MsoAcetate, #yiv8428503880 div.yiv8428503880MsoAcetate {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:8.0pt;}#yiv8428503880 span.yiv8428503880BalloonTextChar {}#yiv8428503880 span.yiv8428503880EmailStyle20 {color:#1F497D;}#yiv8428503880 .yiv8428503880MsoChpDefault {}#yiv8428503880 filtered {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv8428503880 div.yiv8428503880WordSection1 {}#yiv8428503880 Agreed.  I think the NRA has a “hot-line” that sends money whenever they call.  Jeff  From: Mitigating Human Harm on Bird Populations [mailto:<FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>] On Behalf Of Allan Mueller
Sent: Tuesday, March 07, 2017 6:05 PM
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Subject: Fwd: Advice needed (again)  The NRA has had great success by phoning their elected officials.  This may be a better tool than even an original letter.Allan Mueller---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Date: Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 5:59 PM
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again)
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>

When I use prepared email responses like some of those ghost-written by NGOs, I make substantial changes to the text-- to make it my own—while preserving the key points and data.  I typically ask some questions and can follow-up if they are not answered or addressed. Jeff Short From: Mitigating Human Harm on Bird Populations [mailto:<FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman
Sent: Tuesday, March 07, 2017 3:55 PM
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again) There's a timely article in this week's New Yorker about which communication modes are effective (and which not), when contacting federal legislators.

Online petitions, and emails from advocacy group websites, are singled out for not being paid attention to by congressional staff, and thus for being notably ineffective. 
:-/

On 3/6/2017 6:56 PM, Janine Perlman wrote:
Absolutely---"all of the above."  My suggested new M.O. would be in addition to Audubon's current activities, including petitions. 

But in the present situation, past approaches aren't likely to be nearly as effective as they once may have been.  If necessary, I would curtail business as usual, in order to fund new, more aggressive action.  We can hope, though, that Audubon is experiencing a big uptick in support, so curtailing could be minimized?

JanineOn 3/6/2017 6:19 PM, Carol Joan Patterson wrote:
Impressive response!  But I do feel it is urgent for all of us to sign Audubon's and others petitions.Joanie From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Sent: Monday, March 6, 2017 6:10 PM
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again) Hi Jack and all,

I confess to feeling fairly curmudgeonly about Yarnold's missive.  I do respond to virtually every Audubon call to action, but we all---I, you, Yarnold, many others---seem to agree that the new administration is sui generis. 

I'd like Audubon to do much different/more than it's done in the past, i.e., lobby legislators for funding, and "engage with this administration as we have with 28 that preceded it."

I'd like it to make a big change in priorities, and commit to joining other orgs in immediate, vigorous, and numerous legal challenges to EOs, and lawsuits against retro-regulations.  I'd like to know specifically (in the near-term) and strategically (in the longer term) Audubon's plans to aggressively take on and try to block every possible egregious act of this illegitimate administration---perhaps starting with protecting streams from mine waste and going from there.

Thanks as always,
JanineOn 3/5/2017 3:44 PM, Jack and Pam wrote:
Remember the Fellowship of the Wings list serve?  It has been some time since anything has been posted on this discussion list which is dedicated to conservation topics that are verboten on ARBird.  While posting is open to anyone on the list, discussions have often been initiated by me.  Your responses to these posts have been particularly useful during my term serving on the National Audubon Society Board and have been used to make points at board meetings. During the January NAS board meeting considerable time was devoted to the topic of how Audubon should respond to the current political situation and especially to the Trump Presidency.  The result of those discussions is, in part, reflected in the message below written by David Yarnold.  Your thoughts and reactions on this piece, as well as any comments on the comments generated here, would be invaluable to me. Given the makeup of its membership and current national trends, is Audubon on the right track here?  Note that Audubon has already come out strongly against the misogyny, racism, and general lack of respect for differences that have been expressed in the recent national discourse. So can you help me with your reactions?  Thank you in advance. Jack 
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| If your in-box looks like mine, you’ve received  a lot of email about the administration’s first draft of a budget outline. There’s a lot of bold-faced or bright red type on those emails and they make it sound like the proposed budget cuts are a done deal. Audubon thinks you deserve a more thoughtful response. Those emails would also lead you to believe that an executive order to begin the long process of undoing the Clean Power Plan is the end of the line. In fact, the administration’s budget proposal was designed to generate headlines about living up to campaign promises, but it also divided Americans on core values like clean air and clean water. The executive orders are just the beginning of a years-long process that will test the Audubon network’s commitment to science, community and fairness.

Keep in mind a president’s budget proposal is just that: an opening bid. More details will emerge in the coming weeks. Those details will be debated for months in Congress. As we’ve seen in recent weeks on issues ranging from privatizing public lands to health care, you have a chance as constituents to influence how that budget gets shaped. As the voice of birds, Audubon will be by your side. We’ve worked to protect funding for the places birds need for 111 years—with Democrat and Republican presidents and across party lines in Congress. And in the coming weeks and months, we will work harder than ever with our elected representatives on both sides of the political aisle to make sure we continue to protect the clean air, clean water, and stable climate birds and people need to thrive.

It’s clear that this administration, left unchecked, will fundamentally step back from all of those protections in the name of reducing the role of government. While it’s the nature of bureaucracies to need an occasional pruning, other agendas are at work, serving special interests like big oil and coal as well as the super-wealthy.
 
Audubon’s leadership chooses to engage with this administration as we have with 28 that preceded it. We simply won’t stand aside while the future of the Arctic Wilderness or Endangered Species Act gets decided. But we’re under no illusions about how hard the fight will be in the face of many in the administration who equate caring conservation with economic hardship. That cynical and, some would say, blasphemous world view is a complete distortion of the values that drove Republicans from Teddy Roosevelt to Richard Nixon to create national parks and bedrock environmental protections.
 
At every step of the budget process, Audubon—with your continued help and support—will fight to protect funding that’s critical to advancing our conservation work.
 
How can we do it? We’re a credible voice for commonsense conservation, and that transcends party or politics. The Atlantic magazine recently  described Audubon as “one of the oldest and most centrist of conservation-minded groups” in the country. In a polarized political climate, Audubon’s membership is unique, with members and donors from across the political spectrum,including Democrats, Republicans and independents. We are community builders, not community dividers because birds create common ground. When I meet with chapters, I see committed conservationists and I can’t readily tell R’s from I’s or D’s.
 
You, our diverse members, make us an effective organization—in the communities we call home and in Washington D.C. Your representatives need to hear why funding conservation work is so important to you and to Audubon’s efforts across the country. You can be confident that  in the coming weeks and months we will offer you opportunities to raise  your powerful voice at the crucial points when it matters most.
 
Remember, now more than ever, you’re what hope looks like to a bird. Get involved and take action today. |

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| Sincerely, |

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| David Yarnold |

 
| CEO and President
National Audubon Society |

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-- Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"




 
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