Date: 3/13/17 1:05 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
Jonathan,

Yours is a very good question and I thank you for being aware of the toxicity of the products used by most "lawn services". They are intended to fertilize the non-native grasses, and kill "weeds" and "insect pests" but those same chemicals kill not only beneficial insects, invertebrates, and amphibians, but also many birds.

I know you are asking what TO plant but I am going to add to Don Steinkraus' and Mary Ann King's suggestions of what NOT to plant. They offer excellent advice. I agree with their warnings regarding the listed invasive plants. To the invasives I would add Privet, Ailanthus trees (Tree of Heaven), Paulownia trees (Princess Tree), Chinese Bittersweet, Buddleia (Butterfly Bush), Japanese Knotweed, invasive non-clumping bamboo species, and Nandina (Heavenly Bamboo) which is deadly to cats, dogs, and especially to birds who are attracted to and eat the berries.

I have found that the extension services in most Arkansas counties are geared toward agricultural practices, originally intended for livestock and wildlife, but are still being followed several decades after it has been confirmed they are actually harmful to native plants, insects, birds, and other wildlife. Do NOT plant Lespedeza cuneata (Sericea Lespedeza), fescue grass, or other non-native grasses in your yard.

At Ninestone we are still shrinking the size of the original lawns and allowing the small native wildflowers and non-invasive wildflowers that occur in the lawn to go to bloom to support pollinators. So our native plantings are not lawn species, but mostly native prairie grasses, forbs, shrubs and tree species.

I hope these folks don't mind that I mention their names but I know they are dedicated to this topic. Michael Weatherford of the Arkansas Native Plant Society has had success in allowing his lawn to go native, so he may be able to give you suggestions. Joe Neal has also had experience allowing his lawn to go native.
I would also suggest talking to Mary Ann King at Pine Ridge Gardens in London, AR; Susan Frey at Wild Streak Native Plants in Winslow, AR (and facebook); and Ozark Ecological Restoration, Inc. (OERI) in Siloam Springs, AR for their thoughts on what to plant in your yard. OERI might especially have some ideas for grasses for your lawn.

And sorry but I have no idea what micro clover is.

Thanks again for being aware of this issue.

Judith
Ninestone


On Mar 13, 2017, at 2:02 PM, "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr...> wrote:

> We have been battling invasive plants for years in Fayetteville. The standard bad plants: bush and Japanese honeysuckle, Bradford pears, Ailanthus trees, privet, Euonymus, English ivy, Bermuda grass, Johnson grass, Asian lespedeza, multiflora rose. There are several major problems. First, is these plants are very prolific fruit or seed producers. Second, in many cases the seeds can remain viable in the soil for decades. Third, birds eat the fruits of many of the above and transport them widely. So, we have some rural land about 10 miles south of Fayetteville, and baby bush honeysuckles are coming up everywhere in our forest. Most people are not pulling these up. If we stopped pulling them up, walking every foot of the forest, in 5 years it will be wall to wall bush honeysuckle or privet, and goodbye to all the trout lilies, trillium, and other wild flowers.
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Reames, Clark -FS <creames...>
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:44:58 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>
> After retirement, I plan to contract a dozer to get a head start on my privet thickets in AR and try to go back native but I am also realistic in the knowledge that I will have to fight privet for the rest of my days. If your land is privet free now, DO NOT INTRODUCE IT. You will regret it. I didn’t introduce it on my place but I sure wish that somebody else didn’t many years prior…
>
> <image001.png>
> Clark Reames
> Wildlife Program Manager
> Forest Service
> Malheur National Forest
> p: 541-575-3474 x3474
> c: 541-620-0681
> f: 541-575-3002
> <creames...>
> 431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
> John Day, OR 97845
> www.fs.fed.us
> <image002.png><image003.png><image004.png>
> Caring for the land and serving people
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Elizabeth F. Shores
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 10:27 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>
> I think Janet does a good job of promoting the use of native plants. My husband and I often enjoy paraphrasing her advice on invasive Bradford pears: “Prune to ground level and repeat as necessary.”
>
> On Mar 13, 2017, at 12:09 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> wrote:
>
> I’m so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
> SJG
>
>
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>
> From: Mary Ann King
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
> To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: RE: Yard questions
>
> While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.
>
> Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.
>
> MaryAnn King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
>
>
>
> UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>
>
>
>
> Hi all,
>
> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?
>
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
> Elizabeth Findley Shores
> 4408 Sam Peck Rd.
> Little Rock, AR 72223
>
>
>
>
>
>
> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.


 
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