Date: 3/8/17 4:32 pm
From: STEVEN MAUVAIS <stevenmauvais...>
Subject: [obol] Re: obol Digest V6 #73
Dave,

Your message, V6#73, comes across on todays OBOL as total gibberish. I have heard that this is due to submitting your message using an inappropriate format. I also heard that there are other sites, besides OBOL where I might be able to read what you were trying to tell us? I can't remember where that site is, but would like to read what your message was. Can you help me with where this other site is?


Steve

>
> On March 7, 2017 at 10:07 PM <obol...> wrote:
>
> obol Digest Tuesday, March 07 2017 Volume: 06 Issue: 073
>
> In This Issue:
>
> #1: From: Evan Centanni <evan...>
> Subject: [obol] Swan ID (Ankeny NWR)
>
> #2: From: Bill Tice <ticebill7...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: County mimics
>
> #3: From: Bill Tice <ticebill7...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Swan ID
>
> #4: From: Involved <markgreenfield...>
> Subject: [obol] Pine Siskin
>
> #5: From: Linda Fink <linda...>
> Subject: [obol] Dipper question
>
> #6: From: Bob Archer <rabican1...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Dipper question
>
> #7: From: Andrew Marshall <andrewm25...>
> Subject: [obol] Northern Flicker "yellow shafted"
>
> #8: From: Barbara Combs <bcombs232...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Pine Siskin
>
> #9: From: Steven Harder <stevenedwardharder...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Dipper question
>
> #10: From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: County mimics
>
> #11: From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Dipper question
>
> #12: From: Jules Evens <avocetra...>
> Subject: [obol] Dipper question
>
> #13: From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Swan ID (Ankeny NWR)
>
> #14: From: Linda Hadfield <hadfield2...>
> Subject: [obol] Townsend Warblers in lieu of Pine Siskins this winter
>
> #15: From: Harry Fuller <atowhee...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Dipper question
>
> #16: From: Bob Archer <rabican1...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Dipper question
>
> #17: From: Joel Geier <joel.geier...>
> Subject: [obol] Smew reportedly seen at Finley NWR on March 1st
>
> #18: From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Subject: [obol] Malheur writing
>
> #19: From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...>
> Subject: [obol] Trumpeter Swans in the Willamette Basin
>
> #20: From: Bill Tice <ticebill7...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Trumpeter swans in the Willamette basin
>
> #21: From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Trumpeter swans in the Willamette basin
>
> #22: From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Trumpeter swans in the Willamette basin
>
> #23: From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager...>
> Subject: [obol] Trumpeter v. Tundra Swan ID: The eyes have it!
>
> #24: From: Owen Schmidt <oschmidt...>
> Subject: [obol] Birders Night tonight
>
> #25: From: Tom McNamara <tmcmac67...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Trumpeter v. Tundra Swan ID: The eyes have it!
>
> #26: From: <1sallyhill.9...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Trumpeter v. Tundra Swan ID: The eyes have it!
>
> #27: From: Katie McInnis <katminrin...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Pine Siskin
>
> #28: From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan...>
> Subject: [obol] rainy day numbers for county lists - life lists
>
> #29: From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan...>
> Subject: [obol] rainy day numbers for county lists - year lists
>
> #30: From: Mary Lee Sayre <maryleesayre...>
> Subject: [obol] Townsend Solitaire, Oakridge
>
> #31: From: jules evens <avocetra...>
> Subject: [obol] Dipper question
>
> #32: From: Roy Gerig <roygerig...>
> Subject: [obol] Both Goldeneyes on the North Santiam, 100 Varied Thru
>
> #33: From: <jmeredit...>
> Subject: [obol] Harney Bohemian Waxwings
>
> #34: From: David Irons <llsdirons...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Swan ID (Ankeny NWR)
>
> #35: From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman...>
> Subject: [obol] Yaquina Bay Long-tailed Ducks (sans long tails)
>
> #36: From: Khanh Tran <khanhbatran...>
> Subject: [obol] Recent PHOTOS of Owls, Ptarmigans, and other fun bird
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Msg: #1 in digest
> From: Evan Centanni <evan...>
> Subject: [obol] Swan ID (Ankeny NWR)
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 01:27:55 -0800
>
> This past Sunday at Ankeny NWR, after successfully chasing the Tufted Duck
> at Pintail Marsh despite icy winds and rain, Caleb and I headed over to
> EagleMarsh for a quick check.
> There were five swans in the water, one of which had no yellow on its bill.
> However, we concluded based on the shape of its facial features that it was
> still a Tundra Swan, and not a Trumpeter. Yesterday an eBird alert informed
> me of an as-yet-unconfirmed report of a Trumpeter Swan from the refuge,
> whichI'm guessing was the same bird.
>
> I'm still inclined to think ours was a Tundra Swan, but would be happy to
> know what more experienced birders think (and if we're correct, to warn
> others of this possibly misidentified bird showing up in eBird alerts). A
> photo of it appears in my eBird checklist here:
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34999285[1]
>
> Cheers,
> Evan
>
> --
> Evan Centanni
> www.polgeonow.com[2]
>
> --- Links ---
> 1 http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34999285
> 2 http://www.polgeonow.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #2 in digest
> From: Bill Tice <ticebill7...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 07:32:30 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Re: County mimics
>
> I wish Polk was on the successful list, but we only have mocker and sage thrasher. Another one to consider is California Thrasher. Maybe Curry or Jackson has five mimids?
>
> Bill Tice
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #3 in digest
> From: Bill Tice <ticebill7...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 07:34:03 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Re: Swan ID
>
> Regarding the Ankeny swans, not all Tundras show yellow on the bill. Sibley says about 10% don't as I remember.
>
> Bill Tice
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #4 in digest
> From: Involved <markgreenfield...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 07:42:22 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Pine Siskin
>
> We haven't seen a single pine Siskin all winter. Is this just us, or is their absence evident in many places where they are usually seen?
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #5 in digest
> From: Linda Fink <linda...>
> Subject: [obol] Dipper question
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 08:11:59 -0800
>
> Why do Dippers, alone among birds, have white eyelids? White *feathered*
> (tiny feathers) eyelids at that. I can think of possible purposes but
> cannot find, in a web search, any definitive answer.
>
> Linda Fink, pondering in Grand Ronde
> --
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #6 in digest
> From: Bob Archer <rabican1...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 08:23:09 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Re: Dipper question
>
> Sibley states that no one knows for sure but a guess is as an aid in
> communication on noisy streams..
> http://www.sibleyguides.com/2013/04/the-white-eyelid-of-american-dipper/
>
> Bob Archer
> pdx
>
> On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 8:11 AM, Linda Fink <linda...> wrote:
>
> > >
> > Why do Dippers, alone among birds, have white eyelids? White *feathered*
> > (tiny feathers) eyelids at that. I can think of possible purposes but
> > cannot find, in a web search, any definitive answer.
> >
> > Linda Fink, pondering in Grand Ronde
> > --
> >
> > POST: Send your post to <obol...>
> > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> >
> > >
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #7 in digest
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 08:46:43 -0800 (GMT-08:00)
> From: Andrew Marshall <andrewm25...>
> Subject: [obol] Northern Flicker "yellow shafted"
>
> Yesterday morning at about 0720 I had a Northern flicker flash up from the side of the road in front of the truck, as I was on my way to work. It was clearly yellow, not the usual red. Bayview road on the north side of Alsea bay. He was there again this morning, at about the same time, about where the road flattens out after going down the hill from the highway 101, and before the red barn. I say "he" because I got a slightly better look at him this time before he flew and there was a lot of red on the back of his head, possibly the mustache as well??? Both times he has been on the right side of the road when heading west, the uphill side, not the bay side, waiting until the last minute to flush.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #8 in digest
> From: Barbara Combs <bcombs232...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 08:57:16 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Re: Pine Siskin
>
> I keep track of my feeder birds almost daily for a couple of hours. The location is just outside of Eugene. Periodically my feeder is mobbed by Pine Siskins. The last time I had a Pine Siskin at my feeder was in early May, 2016.
>
> Barbara Combs
> Lane County, Oregon
>
> > >
> > On Mar 7, 2017, at 7:42 AM, Involved <markgreenfield...> wrote:
> >
> > We haven't seen a single pine Siskin all winter. Is this just us, or is their absence evident in many places where they are usually seen?
> >
> > Sent from my iPad
> > POST: Send your post to <obol...>
> > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> >
> > >
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #9 in digest
> Subject: [obol] Re: Dipper question
> From: Steven Harder <stevenedwardharder...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 09:00:59 -0800
>
> "Why" is often a murky question when dealing with smaller aspects of morphology. The evolutionary advantage of LOTS of minor traits are unknowable. Given how dippers feed, I think the best guess for any trait in or around the eyes is that it makes immersed vision better (cuts glare?). That said, bird coloration is frequently a product of sexual selection. Murky.
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > >
> > On Mar 7, 2017, at 8:23 AM, Bob Archer <rabican1...> wrote:
> >
> > Sibley states that no one knows for sure but a guess is as an aid in communication on noisy streams..
> >
> > http://www.sibleyguides.com/2013/04/the-white-eyelid-of-american-dipper/
> >
> > Bob Archer
> > pdx
> >
> > > > >
> > > On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 8:11 AM, Linda Fink <linda...> wrote:
> > > Why do Dippers, alone among birds, have white eyelids? White *feathered* (tiny feathers) eyelids at that. I can think of possible purposes but cannot find, in a web search, any definitive answer.
> > >
> > > Linda Fink, pondering in Grand Ronde
> > > --
> > >
> > > POST: Send your post to <obol...>
> > > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> > >
> > > > >
> > >
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #10 in digest
> From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: County mimics
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 09:10:08 -0800
>
> To the best of my knowledge on Josephine, there are 4, but Brown replaced by
> California Thrasher, which hasn't been seen for many decades here now.
>
> Have seen Mocker, Gray Catbird and Sage Thrasher in the county...still
> looking for the remainder.
>
> Dennis
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #11 in digest
> From: "Dennis Vroman" <dpvroman...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Dipper question
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 09:11:11 -0800
>
> Perhaps they use Morse Code.
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Bob Archer
> To: OBOL
> Sent: Tuesday, March 07, 2017 8:23 AM
> Subject: [obol] Re: Dipper question
>
> Sibley states that no one knows for sure but a guess is as an aid in communication on noisy streams..
>
> http://www.sibleyguides.com/2013/04/the-white-eyelid-of-american-dipper/
>
> Bob Archer
> pdx
>
> On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 8:11 AM, Linda Fink <linda...> wrote:
>
> Why do Dippers, alone among birds, have white eyelids? White *feathered* (tiny feathers) eyelids at that. I can think of possible purposes but cannot find, in a web search, any definitive answer.
>
> Linda Fink, pondering in Grand Ronde
> --
>
> POST: Send your post to <obol...>
> JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #12 in digest
> From: Jules Evens <avocetra...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 09:15:48 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Dipper question
>
> That white "third eyelid" is a nictitating membrane and many waterbirds-alcids, loons, etc- have it as a means to clean and protect the eye's surface. (Reptiles and sharks have them as well.) It may also serve some function in communication in some landbirds (e.g. crows and ravens). There is a thorough discussion of its function and anatomy Cornell's "Handbook of Bird Biology (3rd ed.)
> Jules Evens
> Portland
> http://birding.aba.org/mobiledigest/OR01#1250500
>
> Sent by my iPhone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #13 in digest
> Subject: [obol] Re: Swan ID (Ankeny NWR)
> From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 09:24:32 -0800
>
> looks like Tundra based on bill shape and eye position.
> Alan Contreras
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> <acontrer56...>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > >
> > On Mar 7, 2017, at 1:27 AM, Evan Centanni <evan...> wrote:
> >
> > This past Sunday at Ankeny NWR, after successfully chasing the Tufted Duck at Pintail Marsh despite icy winds and rain, Caleb and I headed over to Eagle Marsh for a quick check.
> >
> > There were five swans in the water, one of which had no yellow on its bill. However, we concluded based on the shape of its facial features that it was still a Tundra Swan, and not a Trumpeter. Yesterday an eBird alert informed me of an as-yet-unconfirmed report of a Trumpeter Swan from the refuge, which I'm guessing was the same bird.
> >
> > I'm still inclined to think ours was a Tundra Swan, but would be happy to know what more experienced birders think (and if we're correct, to warn others of this possibly misidentified bird showing up in eBird alerts). A photo of it appears in my eBird checklist here:
> >
> > http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34999285
> >
> > Cheers,
> > Evan
> >
> > --
> > Evan Centanni
> > www.polgeonow.com
> >
> > POST: Send your post to <obol...> JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> >
> > >
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #14 in digest
> From: Linda Hadfield <hadfield2...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 09:34:07 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Townsend Warblers in lieu of Pine Siskins this winter
>
> No Siskins this year, but two to four townsends every day this winter in Witham Hill area in Corvallis. Last few days have had a Bewick Wren too.
>
> Linda
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #15 in digest
> From: Harry Fuller <atowhee...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 09:58:23 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Re: Dipper question
>
> Jules is correct and it is believed the transparent membrane both protects
> the eye when the bird is swimming underwater and protects the necessary
> lubrication to stay on the eyeball and not get dissolved ...the white you
> see is the leading edge of the membrane which moves across the eye like a
> shutter or sliding door...we notice it most on Dippers because we can get
> close enough; been a long time since I was ten feet from a loon
> On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 9:15 AM, Jules Evens <avocetra...> wrote:
>
> > >
> > That white "third eyelid" is a nictitating membrane and many
> > waterbirds-alcids, loons, etc- have it as a means to clean and protect the
> > eye's surface. (Reptiles and sharks have them as well.) It may also serve
> > some function in communication in some landbirds (e.g. crows and ravens).
> > There is a thorough discussion of its function and anatomy Cornell's
> > "Handbook of Bird Biology (3rd ed.)
> > Jules Evens
> > Portland
> > http://birding.aba.org/mobiledigest/OR01#1250500
> >
> > Sent by my iPhone
> >
> > POST: Send your post to <obol...>
> > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> >
> > >
> --
> Harry Fuller
> author of *Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA*, see:
> https://ecowise.wordpress.com/2015/05/08/the-great-gray-owl-book/
> author of *Freeway Birding*, see: *freewaybirding.com
> <http://freewaybirding.com>*
> birding website: http://www.towhee.net
> my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #16 in digest
> Subject: [obol] Re: Dipper question
> From: Bob Archer <rabican1...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 10:14:58 -0800
>
> Folks are getting confused about what they are seeing. The dipper has an eyelid that is covered in white feathers. The original question was in regards to why the dipper has white feathers on its eyelid. The membrane is another neat feature birds have.
> Bob Archer
> Pdx
>
> > >
> > On Mar 7, 2017, at 9:58 AM, Harry Fuller <atowhee...> wrote:
> >
> > Jules is correct and it is believed the transparent membrane both protects the eye when the bird is swimming underwater and protects the necessary lubrication to stay on the eyeball and not get dissolved ...the white you see is the leading edge of the membrane which moves across the eye like a shutter or sliding door...we notice it most on Dippers because we can get close enough; been a long time since I was ten feet from a loon
> >
> > > > >
> > > On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 9:15 AM, Jules Evens <avocetra...> wrote:
> > > That white "third eyelid" is a nictitating membrane and many waterbirds-alcids, loons, etc- have it as a means to clean and protect the eye's surface. (Reptiles and sharks have them as well.) It may also serve some function in communication in some landbirds (e.g. crows and ravens). There is a thorough discussion of its function and anatomy Cornell's "Handbook of Bird Biology (3rd ed.)
> > > Jules Evens
> > > Portland
> > > http://birding.aba.org/mobiledigest/OR01#1250500
> > >
> > > Sent by my iPhone
> > >
> > > POST: Send your post to <obol...>
> > > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> > >
> > > > >
> > --
> > Harry Fuller
> > author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA, see: https://ecowise.wordpress.com/2015/05/08/the-great-gray-owl-book/
> > author of Freeway Birding, see: freewaybirding.com
> > birding website: http://www.towhee.net
> > my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com
> >
> > >
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #17 in digest
> Subject: [obol] Smew reportedly seen at Finley NWR on March 1st
> From: Joel Geier <joel.geier...>
> Date: Tue, 07 Mar 2017 10:26:35 -0800
>
> Hi all,
>
> Last night I received a second-hand report of a SMEW that was seen at
> McFadden Marsh on Finley National Wildlife Refuge on March 1st.
>
> No further details at this time, except to say that the observer is
> highly credible as a waterfowl observer.
>
> Good birding,
> Joel
>
> P.S. Just to chime in on the swan that Evan Centanni photographed at
> Ankeny NWR on Sunday:
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34999285
> I concur that this is a Tundra Swan. In addition to the points mentioned
> by Alan C., the evenly rounded back and neck proportions also support
> the identification as a Tundra Swan. This looks a lot like the bird that
> John Sullivan photographed a week or so ago.
>
> --
> Joel Geier
> Camp Adair area north of Corvallis
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #18 in digest
> From: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 10:33:58 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Malheur writing
>
> There is discussion of producing a book featuring a collection of essays about the Malheur-Steens esthetic and natural history experience (not the occupation; a book on that is in progress at OSU Press).
>
> If you know of anyone who has written any essays about that area, including nontechnical material on specific wildlife species or habits, and who might be interested in being included, please let me know.
>
> It is possible that art and poetry will be included. It is unlikely that much if any photography will be included.
>
> A modest fee is likely.
>
> Deadline probably around August.
>
> I'd appreciate a repost to BOO and other potential venues of interest.
>
> Alan Contreras
> Eugene, Oregon
>
> <acontrer56...>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #19 in digest
> From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...>
> Subject: [obol] Trumpeter Swans in the Willamette Basin
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 10:38:57 -0800
>
> wondering. There have been Trumpeter Swans in the vicinity of Airlie every winter since the mid-seventies. Ankeny NWR is very nearby, yet I'm not sure I've ever read a report of Trumpeters from there. It seems like small numbers of Trumpeters are now being reported from Finley, more than two but less than half a dozen, suggesting a single family. The large flock of Tundra Swans at Harrisburg has been wintering there since at least the early 70s, yet I've never read of a Trumpeter among them.
> Maybe some of this is an artifact of observer effort and opportunity. The swans at both Airlie and Finley can on occasion be observed at very close range. When hundreds of swans are visible a mile away at Sauvie Island, there is little incentive to give them close scrutiny. A family sized group of Trumpeter Swans has been reported off and on in the general vicinity of Forest Grove for decades, and I believe folks have seen them around the former Trojan nuclear power plant, a place that is seldom mentioned on Obol. I'm struck by the stability of these small numbers. Over the decades the Trumpeters have neither gone up in numbers, nor disappeared.
> Lars
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #20 in digest
> From: Bill Tice <ticebill7...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 11:04:37 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Re: Trumpeter swans in the Willamette basin
>
> Lars brings up a good point. It would be good to add that the Airlie Swan flock is in all likelihood spreading out as their territory is being infringed upon by new filbert orchards and grape vineyards. This winter they have not been in that area as consistently as in former years. Also, Lars may have been including the swan flock now near Halsey in mentioning Harrisburg and there have been reports via eBird of Trumpeters near Halsey this winter. Good stuff. Maybe a whooper Swan will show up in the valley soon?????
>
> Bill Tice
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #21 in digest
> Subject: [obol] Re: Trumpeter swans in the Willamette basin
> From: Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 11:24:43 -0800
>
> *
>
> I got it backwards--I meant Halsey, which is the northern part of the H pair, in Linn County. I think I've been to Harrisburg about twice in my life. I recall the earliest reports from Halsey about 71/72 involved a thousand Tundra Swans. Doug Robinson counted two thousand, this winter maybe? Alpha-numeric collars on some of these birds show that they sometimes visit Ridgefield NWR, Roy(Banks)in Wash. Co. and Halsey w/in the same 30 day period. The last two winters I've seen Tundra Swans west of Tangent, near the famous eagle roost. I didn't three and four years ago when I was visiting the area frequently.
> Tundra Swans began showing up on the central Oregon coast, Alsea to Coos Bay, in the seventies, and their number grew modestly each year before they disappeared completely. They were recorded on every Coos CBC for well over a decade. Now they are absent from that count for a decade at a time. I sort of expected something similar to happen with these small spots of Trumpeters.
> Lars
> On Mar 7, 2017, at 11:04 AM, Bill Tice wrote:
>
> > >
> > Lars brings up a good point. It would be good to add that the Airlie Swan flock is in all likelihood spreading out as their territory is being infringed upon by new filbert orchards and grape vineyards. This winter they have not been in that area as consistently as in former years. Also, Lars may have been including the swan flock now near Halsey in mentioning Harrisburg and there have been reports via eBird of Trumpeters near Halsey this winter. Good stuff. Maybe a whooper Swan will show up in the valley soon?????
> >
> > Bill TicePOST: Send your post to <obol...>
> > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> >
> > >
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #22 in digest
> From: Hendrik Herlyn <hhactitis...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 11:32:54 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Re: Trumpeter swans in the Willamette basin
>
> I don't have the details handy right now, but a few years ago, I remember
> finding at least a couple of Trumpeters in the Halsey swan flock. And the
> big swan flock along Hwy 99W, south of Junction City, is another one that
> often had a few Trumpeters with it in recent years.
> Hendrik
>
> On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 11:24 AM, Lars Per Norgren <larspernorgren...>
> wrote:
>
> > >
> > *
> >
> > I got it backwards--I meant Halsey, which is the northern part of the H
> > pair, in Linn County. I think I've been to Harrisburg about twice in my
> > life. I recall the earliest reports from Halsey about 71/72 involved a
> > thousand Tundra Swans. Doug Robinson counted two thousand, this winter
> > maybe? Alpha-numeric collars on some of these birds show that they
> > sometimes visit Ridgefield NWR, Roy(Banks)in Wash. Co. and Halsey w/in the
> > same 30 day period. The last two winters I've seen Tundra Swans west of
> > Tangent, near the famous eagle roost. I didn't three and four years ago
> > when I was visiting the area frequently.
> > Tundra Swans began showing up on the central Oregon coast, Alsea to
> > Coos Bay, in the seventies, and their number grew modestly each year before
> > they disappeared completely. They were recorded on every Coos CBC for well
> > over a decade. Now they are absent from that count for a decade at a time.
> > I sort of expected something similar to happen with these small spots of
> > Trumpeters.
> > Lars
> > On Mar 7, 2017, at 11:04 AM, Bill Tice wrote:
> >
> > > > >
> > > Lars brings up a good point. It would be good to add that the Airlie
> > > Swan flock is in all likelihood spreading out as their territory is being
> > > infringed upon by new filbert orchards and grape vineyards. This winter
> > > they have not been in that area as consistently as in former years. Also,
> > > Lars may have been including the swan flock now near Halsey in mentioning
> > > Harrisburg and there have been reports via eBird of Trumpeters near Halsey
> > > this winter. Good stuff. Maybe a whooper Swan will show up in the valley
> > > soon?????
> > >
> > > Bill TicePOST: Send your post to <obol...>
> > > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> > >
> > > > >
> > POST: Send your post to <obol...>
> > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> >
> > >
> --
>
> __________________________
> Hendrik G. Herlyn
> Corvallis, OR
>
> *"Nature is not a place to visit. It is home." -- Gary Snyder*
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #23 in digest
> From: "Anne & Dan Heyerly" <tanager...>
> Subject: [obol] Trumpeter v. Tundra Swan ID: The eyes have it!
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 12:10:20 -0800
>
> Obolinks,
> With all the variation of yellow/no yellow lores, "U" vs. "V" forehead
> feathering when the swan is directly facing you, or is the bill concave or
> straight (profile)? The discussion up to this point centers around those
> three things, but in my opinion neither is always distinct as a thing. Two
> weekends ago Anne and I birded in the Skagit River area north of Seattle,
> where a good number of both Tundra and Trumpeter Swans were present. We
> came to rely on looking at the eye for identification of these birds.
> Trumpeter's broad black connection of the eye and the mask was what we
> focused on, or as David Sibley says in a Feb. 19, 2006 article on the Sibley
> Guides website
> (http://www.sibleyguides.com/2006/02/distinguishing-trumpeter-and-tundra-swa
> ns/), "the Trumpeter's eye is broadly connected to the black bill, whereas
> the Tundra's eye appears nearly separate from the bill. The Tundra Swan
> illustrated is one of the approximately 10% of all adults that show no
> yellow on the lores. The separation of eye and bill is even more pronounced
> when any yellow is present. On juveniles the feathering is more extensive
> than on adults, and therefore this feature is more variable, but probably
> still useful. The V-shaped border on the forehead of Trumpeter Swan (vs
> U-shaped on Tundra) is useful, but can be hard to judge and some birds
> appear intermediate."
>
> To me, another way of looking at this is to think of the appearance of the
> Tundra's eye as sort of "pinched off" from the black connecting the eye to
> the bill, whereas a Trumpeter's dark eye simply expands directly to the bill
> with no "pinching" (". . . broadly connected to the black bill" - D.
> Sibley).
>
> Whether the bill is straight or concave, is the forehead feathering a "u" or
> a "v", how large is the bird, etc. are all field marks, but all are variable
> depending on which way the bird turns its head (except for size of the bird,
> which is not wise to rely on unless you are certain both species are present
> to compare). It's sort of like relying on the black and white markings on
> dowitcher tails. Not 100% reliable! When we found a mix of both in a flock,
> which was not a common occurrence, our identifications were confirmed when
> they "spoke".
>
> Good Birding,
>
> Dan Heyerly, Eugene
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #24 in digest
> From: Owen Schmidt <oschmidt...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 12:31:34 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Birders Night tonight
>
> ….. Portland Audubon House, 5151 NW Cornell, 7:00 pm free! Terrific program tonight with birds from Africa, the Caribbean, and Brazil. Last notice!
>
> <oschmidt...>
> Tuesday, March 7, 2017
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #25 in digest
> From: Tom McNamara <tmcmac67...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 13:34:10 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Re: Trumpeter v. Tundra Swan ID: The eyes have it!
>
> Hi all,
> Good link, Dan. Here's another that has been adverted over the years on
> OBOL ...and remains a good one or identifying the several species (includes
> Mute) http://www.trumpeterswansociety.org/swan-identification.html
>
> good birding,
> Tom
>
> On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 12:10 PM, Anne & Dan Heyerly <tanager...>
> wrote:
>
> > >
> > Obolinks,
> >
> > With all the variation of yellow/no yellow lores, “U” vs. “V” forehead
> > feathering when the swan is directly facing you, or is the bill concave or
> > straight (profile)? The discussion up to this point centers around those
> > three things, but in my opinion neither is always distinct as a thing. Two
> > weekends ago Anne and I birded in the Skagit River area north of Seattle,
> > where a good number of both Tundra and Trumpeter Swans were present. We
> > came to rely on looking at the eye for identification of these birds.
> > Trumpeter’s broad black connection of the eye and the mask was what we
> > focused on, or as David Sibley says in a Feb. 19, 2006 article on the
> > Sibley Guides website (http://www.sibleyguides.com/2006/02/distinguishing-
> > trumpeter-and-tundra-swans/), “*the Trumpeter’s eye is broadly connected
> > to the black bill, whereas the Tundra’s eye appears nearly separate from
> > the bill. The Tundra Swan illustrated is one of the approximately 10% of
> > all adults that show no yellow on the lores. The separation of eye and bill
> > is even more pronounced when any yellow is present. On juveniles the
> > feathering is more extensive than on adults, and therefore this feature is
> > more variable, but probably still useful. The V-shaped border on the
> > forehead of Trumpeter Swan (vs U-shaped on Tundra) is useful, but can be
> > hard to judge and some birds appear intermediate.*”
> >
> > To me, another way of looking at this is to think of the appearance of the
> > Tundra’s eye as sort of “pinched off” from the black connecting the eye to
> > the bill, whereas a Trumpeter’s dark eye simply expands directly to the
> > bill with no “pinching” (“. . . broadly connected to the black bill” – D.
> > Sibley).
> >
> > Whether the bill is straight or concave, is the forehead feathering a “u”
> > or a “v”, how large is the bird, etc. are all field marks, but all are
> > variable depending on which way the bird turns its head (except for size of
> > the bird, which is not wise to rely on unless you are certain both species
> > are present to compare). It’s sort of like relying on the black and white
> > markings on dowitcher tails. Not 100% reliable! When we found a mix of both
> > in a flock, which was not a common occurrence, our identifications were
> > confirmed when they “spoke”.
> >
> > Good Birding,
> >
> > Dan Heyerly, Eugene
> >
> > >
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #26 in digest
> Subject: [obol] Re: Trumpeter v. Tundra Swan ID: The eyes have it!
> From: <1sallyhill.9...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 13:41:27 -0800
>
> Vickie Buck's photo of a trumpeter and a tundra Swan taken at Ankeny on March 3rd illustrates Dan's point about the eye differences well.
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > >
> > On Mar 7, 2017, at 12:10 PM, Anne & Dan Heyerly <tanager...> wrote:
> >
> > Obolinks,
> >
> > With all the variation of yellow/no yellow lores, “U” vs. “V” forehead feathering when the swan is directly facing you, or is the bill concave or straight (profile)? The discussion up to this point centers around those three things, but in my opinion neither is always distinct as a thing. Two weekends ago Anne and I birded in the Skagit River area north of Seattle, where a good number of both Tundra and Trumpeter Swans were present. We came to rely on looking at the eye for identification of these birds. Trumpeter’s broad black connection of the eye and the mask was what we focused on, or as David Sibley says in a Feb. 19, 2006 article on the Sibley Guides website (http://www.sibleyguides.com/2006/02/distinguishing-trumpeter-and-tundra-swans/), “the Trumpeter’s eye is broadly connected to the black bill, whereas the Tundra’s eye appears nearly separate from the bill. The Tundra Swan illustrated is one of the approximately 10% of all adults that show no yellow on
> > the lores. The separation of eye and bill is even more pronounced when any yellow is present. On juveniles the feathering is more extensive than on adults, and therefore this feature is more variable, but probably still useful. The V-shaped border on the forehead of Trumpeter Swan (vs U-shaped on Tundra) is useful, but can be hard to judge and some birds appear intermediate.”
> >
> > To me, another way of looking at this is to think of the appearance of the Tundra’s eye as sort of “pinched off” from the black connecting the eye to the bill, whereas a Trumpeter’s dark eye simply expands directly to the bill with no “pinching” (“. . . broadly connected to the black bill” – D. Sibley).
> >
> > Whether the bill is straight or concave, is the forehead feathering a “u” or a “v”, how large is the bird, etc. are all field marks, but all are variable depending on which way the bird turns its head (except for size of the bird, which is not wise to rely on unless you are certain both species are present to compare). It’s sort of like relying on the black and white markings on dowitcher tails. Not 100% reliable! When we found a mix of both in a flock, which was not a common occurrence, our identifications were confirmed when they “spoke”.
> >
> > Good Birding,
> >
> > Dan Heyerly, Eugene
> >
> > >
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #27 in digest
> From: Katie McInnis <katminrin...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 13:54:07 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Re: Pine Siskin
>
> I live in Eugene near Delta Ponds. Last year we had a nice little flock of
> Pine Siskins, haven't seen any yet this year.
> On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 8:57 AM, Barbara Combs <bcombs232...> wrote:
>
> > >
> > I keep track of my feeder birds almost daily for a couple of hours. The
> > location is just outside of Eugene. Periodically my feeder is mobbed by
> > Pine Siskins. The last time I had a Pine Siskin at my feeder was in early
> > May, 2016.
> >
> > Barbara Combs
> > Lane County, Oregon
> >
> > > > >
> > > On Mar 7, 2017, at 7:42 AM, Involved <markgreenfield...>
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > > We haven't seen a single pine Siskin all winter. Is this just us, or is
> > > their absence evident in many places where they are usually seen?
> > >
> > > Sent from my iPad
> > > POST: Send your post to <obol...>
> > > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> > >
> > > POST: Send your post to <obol...>
> > > JOIN OR QUIT: http://www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> > >
> > > > >
> > >
> --
> Katie Rinaldi, CWR, DVM
> (765)603-9045
> <katminrin...>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #28 in digest
> From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan...>
> Subject: [obol] rainy day numbers for county lists - life lists
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 14:27:54 -0800
>
> I'm crunching the numbers from our Listing Efforts on this rainy day.
>
> LIFE LISTS:
>
> Here's a ranking of Oregon's 36 counties by the number of people who have
> ever submitted a county Life List since 1998. It shows 2 popular coastal
> counties, the population centers in the Willamette Valley and Bend, and the
> three counties on the south-central part of the state with large refuges
> leading the pack.
>
> The less-visited counties are getting attention from birders working toward
> 100 species in every county.
>
> 152 Harney
>
> 133 Lincoln
>
> 127 Lane
>
> 116 Klamath
>
> 115 Coos
>
> 114 Deschutes
>
> 113 Lake
>
> 109 Tillamook
>
> 98 Multnomah
>
> 93 Benton
>
> 88 Linn
>
> 82 Clatsop
>
> 80 Polk
>
> 79 Washington
>
> 75 Jackson
>
> 74 Curry
>
> 73 Marion
>
> 70 Douglas
>
> 65 Union
>
> 60 Crook
>
> 56 Umatilla
>
> 54 Wallowa
>
> 53 Columbia
>
> 52 Jefferson
>
> 51 Clackamas
>
> 51 Grant
>
> 46 Malheur
>
> 45 Yamhill
>
> 44 Wasco
>
> 42 Josephine
>
> 38 Baker
>
> 36 Sherman
>
> 31 Morrow
>
> 28 Gilliam
>
> 28 Hood River
>
> 28 Wheeler
>
> Here's a ranking of Oregon's 36 counties by the number of people who have
> submitted a Life List this year or had a list > 150 carried forward from
> previous submissions
>
> 131 Harney
>
> 107 Lane
>
> 106 Lincoln
>
> 86 Coos
>
> 86 Klamath
>
> 85 Lake
>
> 78 Deschutes
>
> 76 Tillamook
>
> 70 Benton
>
> 69 Multnomah
>
> 62 Linn
>
> 57 Clatsop
>
> 57 Curry
>
> 55 Washington
>
> 53 Douglas
>
> 52 Polk
>
> 48 Jackson
>
> 47 Marion
>
> 43 Union
>
> 42 Umatilla
>
> 40 Crook
>
> 38 Wallowa
>
> 37 Jefferson
>
> 34 Columbia
>
> 33 Wasco
>
> 31 Clackamas
>
> 31 Grant
>
> 30 Malheur
>
> 29 Baker
>
> 29 Yamhill
>
> 28 Josephine
>
> 25 Sherman
>
> 24 Morrow
>
> 23 Gilliam
>
> 22 Wheeler
>
> 20 Hood River
>
> Good armchair birding,
>
> Paul Sullivan
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #29 in digest
> From: "Paul Sullivan" <paultsullivan...>
> Subject: [obol] rainy day numbers for county lists - year lists
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 14:31:06 -0800
>
> More crunching the numbers from our Listing Efforts on this rainy day.
>
> YEAR LISTS:
>
> Here's a ranking of Oregon's 36 counties by the number of people who have
> ever submitted a county Year List since 1998. It shows a little different
> pattern than the Life List table. Part of the effort may be due to birders
> focusing around population centers, or pursuing 100 in every county.
>
> 53 Harney
>
> 34 Lane
>
> 30 Lincoln
>
> 30 Multnomah
>
> 25 Klamath
>
> 25 Washington
>
> 23 Benton
>
> 23 Deschutes
>
> 18 Lake
>
> 17 Coos
>
> 17 Curry
>
> 16 Clackamas
>
> 16 Jackson
>
> 16 Polk
>
> 15 Tillamook
>
> 14 Clatsop
>
> 14 Crook
>
> 12 Grant
>
> 12 Linn
>
> 11 Marion
>
> 11 Wallowa
>
> 10 Baker
>
> 10 Columbia
>
> 10 Yamhill
>
> 8 Douglas
>
> 8 Jefferson
>
> 8 Umatilla
>
> 7 Malheur
>
> 7 Morrow
>
> 7 Union
>
> 7 Wasco
>
> 6 Josephine
>
> 5 Gilliam
>
> 4 Hood River
>
> 4 Sherman
>
> 4 Wheeler
>
> Here's a ranking of Oregon's 36 counties by the number of people who have
> submitted a Year List this year. Notice the number of counties with no year
> list in 2016. Last year there was an entry for every county. Lincoln
> county was hot in 2016, with a number of rare birds to go see, Common
> Scoter, White-winged Dove, etc.
>
> 16 Lincoln
>
> 13 Harney
>
> 12 Deschutes
>
> 11 Lane
>
> 8 Multnomah
>
> 7 Clackamas
>
> 7 Klamath
>
> 6 Benton
>
> 6 Crook
>
> 5 Jackson
>
> 5 Linn
>
> 5 Marion
>
> 5 Polk
>
> 4 Clatsop
>
> 4 Washington
>
> 3 Coos
>
> 3 Lake
>
> 3 Tillamook
>
> 3 Yamhill
>
> 2 Baker
>
> 2 Columbia
>
> 2 Jefferson
>
> 2 Umatilla
>
> 2 Wallowa
>
> 1 Curry
>
> 1 Douglas
>
> 1 Grant
>
> 1 Josephine
>
> 1 Malheur
>
> 1 Morrow
>
> 1 Union
>
> 1 Wheeler
>
> 0 Gilliam
>
> 0 Hood River
>
> 0 Sherman
>
> 0 Wasco
>
> Good armchair birding,
>
> Paul Sullivan
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #30 in digest
> From: Mary Lee Sayre <maryleesayre...>
> Subject: [obol] Townsend Solitaire, Oakridge
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 14:46:39 -0800
>
> I found my first TOWNSEND SOLITAIRE in the Oakridge area. I know they’re around but haven’t seen one in the 6 years i’ve been actively birding around here. Not quite a yard bird but awful close...
>
> Also FOY VARIED THRUSH in my yard.
>
> Mary Lee
>
> Oakridge
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #31 in digest
> From: jules evens <avocetra...>
> Subject: [obol] Dipper question
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 15:11:14 -0800
>
> Thanks for clarifying, Bob. Yes, David Sibley has a (characteristically) good essay on this subject.
> I guess white eyelids and nictitating membranes co-exist. Always nice to learn more ouzel lore!
> Jules Evens
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #32 in digest
> From: Roy Gerig <roygerig...>
> Date: Tue, 7 Mar 2017 16:00:11 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Both Goldeneyes on the North Santiam, 100 Varied Thrushes,no ha
>
> I know how that sounds about swans. Like many other ids between closely
> related birds, you will know a Trumpeter when you see it. If you have to
> try very hard then it is not what you want it to be. Bill is right saying
> they are not as restricted to that area between Suver and Maple Grove
> (Polk) as they were from the early 1970s to recently. Still the only
> Trumpeter I know at Ankeny NWR was one there for a long while in the early
> spring a couple of years ago, and I think something was wrong with it.
> I drove as far up the North Santiam Canyon as I could safely get today
> looking at that river where I could.
>
> Most noticeable in the dismal weather, and snow starting just past Gates
> (Marion) were flocks of VARIED THRUSH ranging from 50 to 20 to 10, more
> than 100 altogether. Not surprising, as they are one of the commonest and
> most ubiquitous nesters in the Coast Range and the Cascades around here.
> Looks like they are on the move right now. A flock of 50 at North Santiam
> State Park was as many as I remember ever seeing at once. When I stopped
> there 2 hours later on the way back down, they were nowhere to be seen
>
> GOLDENEYES: North Santiam SP boat launch area had one COMMON. Fisherman's
> Bend had one COMMON, and one maybe BARROWS female bill mostly yellow, but
> diving often so feathers appressed, it could have been either. Big Cliff
> Reservoir had 3 BARROWS, 2 COMMONS. I turned around soon past Detroit Dam,
> the road getting questionable and me with no snow tires (We hardly ever
> have snow in March).
>
> I saw my first OSPREY of the year at FishBend, hunting conditions much
> better there, the water clear green, not chocolate milk like the Willamette
> is where I have not seen/heard one in my yard yet this year.
>
> Roy Gerig Salem OR
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #33 in digest
> Date: Tue, 07 Mar 2017 16:20:30 -0800
> From: <jmeredit...>
> Subject: [obol] Harney Bohemian Waxwings
>
> Picked up Tim Blount today in Burns for a little visit. At the corner of
> Ivy and Hwy 78, we had a small waxwing flock.There may have been Cedar
> Waxwings with it but all we saw were Bohemian Waxwings. Tim said there
> has been a big flock around Burns for a while this winter. Several
> Rough-legged Hawks are still around Harney County.
>
> Tim says hi to his OBOL friends. He is starting to get out more doing
> some birding. Tim has been seeing Sandhill Cranes etc, including 2 white
> plumaged Sandhills. It was snowing today in the area. I wish I could
> warn birds to hold off if they are still south of here.
>
> Good birding, Judy, <jmeredit...>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #34 in digest
> From: David Irons <llsdirons...>
> Subject: [obol] Re: Swan ID (Ankeny NWR)
> Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 00:52:55 +0000
>
> #
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> ށ�^�{h�������ښ)r��.��"� �� �j� ��hrK�!� �r azg譩��� �)�� �jh������r������&���ޞ�օ�Ӯ�z׫��ݺ����b� ��;�v��� ���ݶ�ޡ����^�ǥ�� ��^����{(~�^~Z �� � �����g��� �wkj�ֆ)^�جq��j)�ʚ,�&�y�+jȧ�W���z׫���r�좻b� "� ��������ڳ�a{&�zI���!ɺ�v,����ڭ��ܩ�ƥm�Z�*+�X�jYr�'�� ��h��N����^�h�yا�+aN�ݭ�-���‹�vX�z\�y��' i�^v'�z��q觲,�� ���^N����^���� Z� �jwe�x �w���b� �z��j�^j��q��j�����I��~�&�(����:s ����^�j��ې � Z�*'���j��r������&j)�r��������r������&j)�r���
> ��墉,�) N�ݭ�ڱ�h�����Z��u잦�"�*'� Z�*'���j�.�����ނ��r������&j)�r��������r������&j)�r��I��~�&�(����:s ����^�j��۰ �Kڜ'������j�z{Z�x�r�������޽��q��jy���&��+���N ���-J��k&� y �#VG������ ���\���"� ay;���C�� ��1��׬�+^�̰�wljwkj)� �^m��" �u�h���F��� ��_����'$r ����z��z��������{a{ �z��� � �� �����Z0�x���������ޯ� r�ܖ�^u��y�'� ���^������_y�n��-��b� ��إ�����K ��ݞ�ZN����^�� �׫u����b�֥z�b��+��fz�ڝ������w(���kz�+���N����^�, ����^������'!#��,�x0j�azƦy��w����b�X�rX�y�h� ����� �i;�v�����n�p��]m�Z����I�� Z�j+y�iz���ǝn*�z�-�)��݉� ������r�� ���az�(~�b��,�&��h��ק�'�y���!� ���b��b�֥z�l��)��h��j�^j�"�l� *�r ��X�� �{�m�������� �n*�����!y�%��K~=�ݼ�(^z�� ����/jp��֧�,0��h� ����r����i���� �X �z0��&��O���ܨ��h��h��%���zX���� �j)m�� �_߭祊�l����4�PP����i���� ߭祊�l����X��� �S�8��r �z��� ߭祊�l����܆+�����m���� 0���zX���� ڭ�b���n��
> ��i�f�׫j�+����u�ڶ�����zX���� �j)m�� �_�׫j�+���y�b������
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #35 in digest
> Date: Tue, 07 Mar 2017 20:02:45 -0800
> Subject: [obol] Yaquina Bay Long-tailed Ducks (sans long tails)
> From: "Wayne Hoffman" <whoffman...>
>
> Since the Herring spawning event about 10 days ago, a few Long-tailed Ducks have been consorting with the Surf Scoters and other Diving Ducks eating Herring roe.
> These duck have the most complicated molt sequences known among waterfowl, and show an incredible range of plumages. Chuck Philo and I have been trying to keep track of individuals, and over the last 10 days have recognized 10 different individuals, although we have never seem more than 5 at one time.
>
> This afternoon, in stormy weather, I found 2 new individuals. One was a female pretty much on breeding plumage with a black head but white cheeks, white on the neck and chest, and blackish back and wings. The other is a male with longer back plumes and a prominent black tip on its bill.
>
> i have never found more than 5 Long-tails here in previous winters.
>
> Wayne
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Msg: #36 in digest
> From: Khanh Tran <khanhbatran...>
> Subject: [obol] Recent PHOTOS of Owls, Ptarmigans, and other fun birds on snow
> Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2017 04:25:49 +0000
>
> Hi Obolers:�
>
> I finally had some time to edit some�recent photos of owls, ptarmigans, and other fun birds on snow. �
>
> There is so much beauty to see and capture in the field and everything looks so pretty on snow.....
>
> Hope you will enjoy the photos...
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/23662496@N02/
>
> Peace, love and good birding....
>
> Khanh
>
> www.ktbirding.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of obol Digest V6 #73
>
> *************************
>

 
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